stepdaughter, Serena - - they have beenwonderful to me; as has my faithful staff and secretaries: Norma Wong,Suzanne Anderson, and Loretta Walsh. I thank God for their devotionand dedication to helping people.I lost four dear people out of my life this year, one by divorce (mybeloved wife of fifteen years, Carol) and three by death in the arms ofGod: my ninety-seven year-old aunt, Sister Esther Mary, of theCommunity of the Transfiguration (Episcopal) in Glendale, Ohio, whotaught me to serve the Lord, from my youth up; a famous psychic anddear friend of mine for many years, Jack Schwarz, of Ashland, Oregon(we used to go white-water rafting together); and last, but hardlyleast, a beloved colleague of mine in this field, Yana Parker, authorof The Damn Good Resume Book, who died after a long battle with cancer.I thank God for all of them their example, their lives and their love.In closing, I'd have to be an ingrate not to mention my profoundthanks to The Great Lord God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, andsource of all grace, wisdom, and compassion, Who has given me this workof helping so many people of different faiths, tongues, and nations,with their job-hunt, and with finding meaning for their lives. I amgrateful beyond measure for such a life, such a mission, and such aprivilege.Dick Bolles P.O. Box 379 Walnut Creek California 94597-0379 Wednesday,September 12, 2001My Annual Grammar & Language FootnoteI want to explain four points of grammar, in this book of mine:pronouns, commas, italics, and spelling. My unorthodox use of theminvariably offends unemployed English teachers so much that they writeme to apply for a job as my editor.To save us unnecessary correspondence, let me explain. Throughout thisbook, I often use the apparently plural pronoun "they," "them," or"their" after singular antecedents such as, "You must approach someonefor a job and tell them what you can do." This sounds strange and evenwrong to those who know English well. To be sure, we all know there isanother pronoun - "you" - - that may be either singular or plural, butfew of us realize that the pronouns "they," "them," or "their" werealso once treated as both plural and singular in the English language.This changed, at a time in English history when agreement in numberbecame more important than agreement as to sexual gender. Today,however, our priorities have shifted once again. Now, thedistinguishing of sexual gender is considered by many to be moreimportant than agreement in number.The common artifices used for this new priority, such as "she," or "heand she," are--to my mind--tortured and inelegant. Casey Miller andKate Swift, in their classic, The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing, agree,and argue that it is time to bring back the earlier usage of "they,""them," and "their" as both singular and plural just as "you" is areThey further argue that this return to the earlier historical usage hasalready become quite common out on the street--witness a typical signby the ocean which reads "Anyone using this beach after 5 p.m. does soat their own risk.

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stepdaughter, Serena - - they have beenwonderful to me; as has my faithful staff and secretaries: Norma Wong,Suzanne Anderson, and Loretta Walsh. I thank God for their devotionand dedication to helping people.I lost four dear people out of my life this year, one by divorce (mybeloved wife of fifteen years, Carol) and three by death in the arms ofGod: my ninety-seven year-old aunt, Sister Esther Mary, of theCommunity of the Transfiguration (Episcopal) in Glendale, Ohio, whotaught me to serve the Lord, from my youth up; a famous psychic anddear friend of mine for many years, Jack Schwarz, of Ashland, Oregon(we used to go white-water rafting together); and last, but hardlyleast, a beloved colleague of mine in this field, Yana Parker, authorof The Damn Good Resume Book, who died after a long battle with cancer.I thank God for all of them their example, their lives and their love.In closing, I'd have to be an ingrate not to mention my profoundthanks to The Great Lord God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, andsource of all grace, wisdom, and compassion, Who has given me this workof helping so many people of different faiths, tongues, and nations,with their job-hunt, and with finding meaning for their lives. I amgrateful beyond measure for such a life, such a mission, and such aprivilege.Dick Bolles P.O. Box 379 Walnut Creek California 94597-0379 Wednesday,September 12, 2001My Annual Grammar & Language FootnoteI want to explain four points of grammar, in this book of mine:pronouns, commas, italics, and spelling. My unorthodox use of theminvariably offends unemployed English teachers so much that they writeme to apply for a job as my editor.To save us unnecessary correspondence, let me explain. Throughout thisbook, I often use the apparently plural pronoun "they," "them," or"their" after singular antecedents such as, "You must approach someonefor a job and tell them what you can do." This sounds strange and evenwrong to those who know English well. To be sure, we all know there isanother pronoun - "you" - - that may be either singular or plural, butfew of us realize that the pronouns "they," "them," or "their" werealso once treated as both plural and singular in the English language.This changed, at a time in English history when agreement in numberbecame more important than agreement as to sexual gender. Today,however, our priorities have shifted once again. Now, thedistinguishing of sexual gender is considered by many to be moreimportant than agreement in number.The common artifices used for this new priority, such as "she," or "heand she," are--to my mind--tortured and inelegant. Casey Miller andKate Swift, in their classic, The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing, agree,and argue that it is time to bring back the earlier usage of "they,""them," and "their" as both singular and plural just as "you" is areThey further argue that this return to the earlier historical usage hasalready become quite common out on the street--witness a typical signby the ocean which reads "Anyone using this beach after 5 p.m. does soat their own risk.,欧洲杯四强竞猜stepdaughter, Serena - - they have beenwonderful to me; as has my faithful staff and secretaries: Norma Wong,Suzanne Anderson, and Loretta Walsh. I thank God for their devotionand dedication to helping people.I lost four dear people out of my life this year, one by divorce (mybeloved wife of fifteen years, Carol) and three by death in the arms ofGod: my ninety-seven year-old aunt, Sister Esther Mary, of theCommunity of the Transfiguration (Episcopal) in Glendale, Ohio, whotaught me to serve the Lord, from my youth up; a famous psychic anddear friend of mine for many years, Jack Schwarz, of Ashland, Oregon(we used to go white-water rafting together); and last, but hardlyleast, a beloved colleague of mine in this field, Yana Parker, authorof The Damn Good Resume Book, who died after a long battle with cancer.I thank God for all of them their example, their lives and their love.In closing, I'd have to be an ingrate not to mention my profoundthanks to The Great Lord God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, andsource of all grace, wisdom, and compassion, Who has given me this workof helping so many people of different faiths, tongues, and nations,with their job-hunt, and with finding meaning for their lives. I amgrateful beyond measure for such a life, such a mission, and such aprivilege.Dick Bolles P.O. Box 379 Walnut Creek California 94597-0379 Wednesday,September 12, 2001My Annual Grammar & Language FootnoteI want to explain four points of grammar, in this book of mine:pronouns, commas, italics, and spelling. My unorthodox use of theminvariably offends unemployed English teachers so much that they writeme to apply for a job as my editor.To save us unnecessary correspondence, let me explain. Throughout thisbook, I often use the apparently plural pronoun "they," "them," or"their" after singular antecedents such as, "You must approach someonefor a job and tell them what you can do." This sounds strange and evenwrong to those who know English well. To be sure, we all know there isanother pronoun - "you" - - that may be either singular or plural, butfew of us realize that the pronouns "they," "them," or "their" werealso once treated as both plural and singular in the English language.This changed, at a time in English history when agreement in numberbecame more important than agreement as to sexual gender. Today,however, our priorities have shifted once again. Now, thedistinguishing of sexual gender is considered by many to be moreimportant than agreement in number.The common artifices used for this new priority, such as "she," or "heand she," are--to my mind--tortured and inelegant. Casey Miller andKate Swift, in their classic, The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing, agree,and argue that it is time to bring back the earlier usage of "they,""them," and "their" as both singular and plural just as "you" is areThey further argue that this return to the earlier historical usage hasalready become quite common out on the street--witness a typical signby the ocean which reads "Anyone using this beach after 5 p.m. does soat their own risk.stepdaughter, Serena - - they have beenwonderful to me; as has my faithful staff and secretaries: Norma Wong,Suzanne Anderson, and Loretta Walsh. I thank God for their devotionand dedication to helping people.I lost four dear people out of my life this year, one by divorce (mybeloved wife of fifteen years, Carol) and three by death in the arms ofGod: my ninety-seven year-old aunt, Sister Esther Mary, of theCommunity of the Transfiguration (Episcopal) in Glendale, Ohio, whotaught me to serve the Lord, from my youth up; a famous psychic anddear friend of mine for many years, Jack Schwarz, of Ashland, Oregon(we used to go white-water rafting together); and last, but hardlyleast, a beloved colleague of mine in this field, Yana Parker, authorof The Damn Good Resume Book, who died after a long battle with cancer.I thank God for all of them their example, their lives and their love.In closing, I'd have to be an ingrate not to mention my profoundthanks to The Great Lord God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, andsource of all grace, wisdom, and compassion, Who has given me this workof helping so many people of different faiths, tongues, and nations,with their job-hunt, and with finding meaning for their lives. I amgrateful beyond measure for such a life, such a mission, and such aprivilege.Dick Bolles P.O. Box 379 Walnut Creek California 94597-0379 Wednesday,September 12, 2001My Annual Grammar & Language FootnoteI want to explain four points of grammar, in this book of mine:pronouns, commas, italics, and spelling. My unorthodox use of theminvariably offends unemployed English teachers so much that they writeme to apply for a job as my editor.To save us unnecessary correspondence, let me explain. Throughout thisbook, I often use the apparently plural pronoun "they," "them," or"their" after singular antecedents such as, "You must approach someonefor a job and tell them what you can do." This sounds strange and evenwrong to those who know English well. To be sure, we all know there isanother pronoun - "you" - - that may be either singular or plural, butfew of us realize that the pronouns "they," "them," or "their" werealso once treated as both plural and singular in the English language.This changed, at a time in English history when agreement in numberbecame more important than agreement as to sexual gender. Today,however, our priorities have shifted once again. Now, thedistinguishing of sexual gender is considered by many to be moreimportant than agreement in number.The common artifices used for this new priority, such as "she," or "heand she," are--to my mind--tortured and inelegant. Casey Miller andKate Swift, in their classic, The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing, agree,and argue that it is time to bring back the earlier usage of "they,""them," and "their" as both singular and plural just as "you" is areThey further argue that this return to the earlier historical usage hasalready become quite common out on the street--witness a typical signby the ocean which reads "Anyone using this beach after 5 p.m. does soat their own risk.,stepdaughter, Serena - - they have beenwonderful to me; as has my faithful staff and secretaries: Norma Wong,Suzanne Anderson, and Loretta Walsh. I thank God for their devotionand dedication to helping people.I lost four dear people out of my life this year, one by divorce (mybeloved wife of fifteen years, Carol) and three by death in the arms ofGod: my ninety-seven year-old aunt, Sister Esther Mary, of theCommunity of the Transfiguration (Episcopal) in Glendale, Ohio, whotaught me to serve the Lord, from my youth up; a famous psychic anddear friend of mine for many years, Jack Schwarz, of Ashland, Oregon(we used to go white-water rafting together); and last, but hardlyleast, a beloved colleague of mine in this field, Yana Parker, authorof The Damn Good Resume Book, who died after a long battle with cancer.I thank God for all of them their example, their lives and their love.In closing, I'd have to be an ingrate not to mention my profoundthanks to The Great Lord God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, andsource of all grace, wisdom, and compassion, Who has given me this workof helping so many people of different faiths, tongues, and nations,with their job-hunt, and with finding meaning for their lives. I amgrateful beyond measure for such a life, such a mission, and such aprivilege.Dick Bolles P.O. Box 379 Walnut Creek California 94597-0379 Wednesday,September 12, 2001My Annual Grammar & Language FootnoteI want to explain four points of grammar, in this book of mine:pronouns, commas, italics, and spelling. My unorthodox use of theminvariably offends unemployed English teachers so much that they writeme to apply for a job as my editor.To save us unnecessary correspondence, let me explain. Throughout thisbook, I often use the apparently plural pronoun "they," "them," or"their" after singular antecedents such as, "You must approach someonefor a job and tell them what you can do." This sounds strange and evenwrong to those who know English well. To be sure, we all know there isanother pronoun - "you" - - that may be either singular or plural, butfew of us realize that the pronouns "they," "them," or "their" werealso once treated as both plural and singular in the English language.This changed, at a time in English history when agreement in numberbecame more important than agreement as to sexual gender. Today,however, our priorities have shifted once again. Now, thedistinguishing of sexual gender is considered by many to be moreimportant than agreement in number.The common artifices used for this new priority, such as "she," or "heand she," are--to my mind--tortured and inelegant. Casey Miller andKate Swift, in their classic, The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing, agree,and argue that it is time to bring back the earlier usage of "they,""them," and "their" as both singular and plural just as "you" is areThey further argue that this return to the earlier historical usage hasalready become quite common out on the street--witness a typical signby the ocean which reads "Anyone using this beach after 5 p.m. does soat their own risk.,stepdaughter, Serena - - they have beenwonderful to me; as has my faithful staff and secretaries: Norma Wong,Suzanne Anderson, and Loretta Walsh. I thank God for their devotionand dedication to helping people.I lost four dear people out of my life this year, one by divorce (mybeloved wife of fifteen years, Carol) and three by death in the arms ofGod: my ninety-seven year-old aunt, Sister Esther Mary, of theCommunity of the Transfiguration (Episcopal) in Glendale, Ohio, whotaught me to serve the Lord, from my youth up; a famous psychic anddear friend of mine for many years, Jack Schwarz, of Ashland, Oregon(we used to go white-water rafting together); and last, but hardlyleast, a beloved colleague of mine in this field, Yana Parker, authorof The Damn Good Resume Book, who died after a long battle with cancer.I thank God for all of them their example, their lives and their love.In closing, I'd have to be an ingrate not to mention my profoundthanks to The Great Lord God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, andsource of all grace, wisdom, and compassion, Who has given me this workof helping so many people of different faiths, tongues, and nations,with their job-hunt, and with finding meaning for their lives. I amgrateful beyond measure for such a life, such a mission, and such aprivilege.Dick Bolles P.O. Box 379 Walnut Creek California 94597-0379 Wednesday,September 12, 2001My Annual Grammar & Language FootnoteI want to explain four points of grammar, in this book of mine:pronouns, commas, italics, and spelling. My unorthodox use of theminvariably offends unemployed English teachers so much that they writeme to apply for a job as my editor.To save us unnecessary correspondence, let me explain. Throughout thisbook, I often use the apparently plural pronoun "they," "them," or"their" after singular antecedents such as, "You must approach someonefor a job and tell them what you can do." This sounds strange and evenwrong to those who know English well. To be sure, we all know there isanother pronoun - "you" - - that may be either singular or plural, butfew of us realize that the pronouns "they," "them," or "their" werealso once treated as both plural and singular in the English language.This changed, at a time in English history when agreement in numberbecame more important than agreement as to sexual gender. Today,however, our priorities have shifted once again. Now, thedistinguishing of sexual gender is considered by many to be moreimportant than agreement in number.The common artifices used for this new priority, such as "she," or "heand she," are--to my mind--tortured and inelegant. Casey Miller andKate Swift, in their classic, The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing, agree,and argue that it is time to bring back the earlier usage of "they,""them," and "their" as both singular and plural just as "you" is areThey further argue that this return to the earlier historical usage hasalready become quite common out on the street--witness a typical signby the ocean which reads "Anyone using this beach after 5 p.m. does soat their own risk.

stepdaughter, Serena - - they have beenwonderful to me; as has my faithful staff and secretaries: Norma Wong,Suzanne Anderson, and Loretta Walsh. I thank God for their devotionand dedication to helping people.I lost four dear people out of my life this year, one by divorce (mybeloved wife of fifteen years, Carol) and three by death in the arms ofGod: my ninety-seven year-old aunt, Sister Esther Mary, of theCommunity of the Transfiguration (Episcopal) in Glendale, Ohio, whotaught me to serve the Lord, from my youth up; a famous psychic anddear friend of mine for many years, Jack Schwarz, of Ashland, Oregon(we used to go white-water rafting together); and last, but hardlyleast, a beloved colleague of mine in this field, Yana Parker, authorof The Damn Good Resume Book, who died after a long battle with cancer.I thank God for all of them their example, their lives and their love.In closing, I'd have to be an ingrate not to mention my profoundthanks to The Great Lord God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, andsource of all grace, wisdom, and compassion, Who has given me this workof helping so many people of different faiths, tongues, and nations,with their job-hunt, and with finding meaning for their lives. I amgrateful beyond measure for such a life, such a mission, and such aprivilege.Dick Bolles P.O. Box 379 Walnut Creek California 94597-0379 Wednesday,September 12, 2001My Annual Grammar & Language FootnoteI want to explain four points of grammar, in this book of mine:pronouns, commas, italics, and spelling. My unorthodox use of theminvariably offends unemployed English teachers so much that they writeme to apply for a job as my editor.To save us unnecessary correspondence, let me explain. Throughout thisbook, I often use the apparently plural pronoun "they," "them," or"their" after singular antecedents such as, "You must approach someonefor a job and tell them what you can do." This sounds strange and evenwrong to those who know English well. To be sure, we all know there isanother pronoun - "you" - - that may be either singular or plural, butfew of us realize that the pronouns "they," "them," or "their" werealso once treated as both plural and singular in the English language.This changed, at a time in English history when agreement in numberbecame more important than agreement as to sexual gender. Today,however, our priorities have shifted once again. Now, thedistinguishing of sexual gender is considered by many to be moreimportant than agreement in number.The common artifices used for this new priority, such as "she," or "heand she," are--to my mind--tortured and inelegant. Casey Miller andKate Swift, in their classic, The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing, agree,and argue that it is time to bring back the earlier usage of "they,""them," and "their" as both singular and plural just as "you" is areThey further argue that this return to the earlier historical usage hasalready become quite common out on the street--witness a typical signby the ocean which reads "Anyone using this beach after 5 p.m. does soat their own risk.,18年欧洲杯买球appstepdaughter, Serena - - they have beenwonderful to me; as has my faithful staff and secretaries: Norma Wong,Suzanne Anderson, and Loretta Walsh. I thank God for their devotionand dedication to helping people.I lost four dear people out of my life this year, one by divorce (mybeloved wife of fifteen years, Carol) and three by death in the arms ofGod: my ninety-seven year-old aunt, Sister Esther Mary, of theCommunity of the Transfiguration (Episcopal) in Glendale, Ohio, whotaught me to serve the Lord, from my youth up; a famous psychic anddear friend of mine for many years, Jack Schwarz, of Ashland, Oregon(we used to go white-water rafting together); and last, but hardlyleast, a beloved colleague of mine in this field, Yana Parker, authorof The Damn Good Resume Book, who died after a long battle with cancer.I thank God for all of them their example, their lives and their love.In closing, I'd have to be an ingrate not to mention my profoundthanks to The Great Lord God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, andsource of all grace, wisdom, and compassion, Who has given me this workof helping so many people of different faiths, tongues, and nations,with their job-hunt, and with finding meaning for their lives. I amgrateful beyond measure for such a life, such a mission, and such aprivilege.Dick Bolles P.O. Box 379 Walnut Creek California 94597-0379 Wednesday,September 12, 2001My Annual Grammar & Language FootnoteI want to explain four points of grammar, in this book of mine:pronouns, commas, italics, and spelling. My unorthodox use of theminvariably offends unemployed English teachers so much that they writeme to apply for a job as my editor.To save us unnecessary correspondence, let me explain. Throughout thisbook, I often use the apparently plural pronoun "they," "them," or"their" after singular antecedents such as, "You must approach someonefor a job and tell them what you can do." This sounds strange and evenwrong to those who know English well. To be sure, we all know there isanother pronoun - "you" - - that may be either singular or plural, butfew of us realize that the pronouns "they," "them," or "their" werealso once treated as both plural and singular in the English language.This changed, at a time in English history when agreement in numberbecame more important than agreement as to sexual gender. Today,however, our priorities have shifted once again. Now, thedistinguishing of sexual gender is considered by many to be moreimportant than agreement in number.The common artifices used for this new priority, such as "she," or "heand she," are--to my mind--tortured and inelegant. Casey Miller andKate Swift, in their classic, The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing, agree,and argue that it is time to bring back the earlier usage of "they,""them," and "their" as both singular and plural just as "you" is areThey further argue that this return to the earlier historical usage hasalready become quite common out on the street--witness a typical signby the ocean which reads "Anyone using this beach after 5 p.m. does soat their own risk.,stepdaughter, Serena - - they have beenwonderful to me; as has my faithful staff and secretaries: Norma Wong,Suzanne Anderson, and Loretta Walsh. I thank God for their devotionand dedication to helping people.I lost four dear people out of my life this year, one by divorce (mybeloved wife of fifteen years, Carol) and three by death in the arms ofGod: my ninety-seven year-old aunt, Sister Esther Mary, of theCommunity of the Transfiguration (Episcopal) in Glendale, Ohio, whotaught me to serve the Lord, from my youth up; a famous psychic anddear friend of mine for many years, Jack Schwarz, of Ashland, Oregon(we used to go white-water rafting together); and last, but hardlyleast, a beloved colleague of mine in this field, Yana Parker, authorof The Damn Good Resume Book, who died after a long battle with cancer.I thank God for all of them their example, their lives and their love.In closing, I'd have to be an ingrate not to mention my profoundthanks to The Great Lord God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, andsource of all grace, wisdom, and compassion, Who has given me this workof helping so many people of different faiths, tongues, and nations,with their job-hunt, and with finding meaning for their lives. I amgrateful beyond measure for such a life, such a mission, and such aprivilege.Dick Bolles P.O. Box 379 Walnut Creek California 94597-0379 Wednesday,September 12, 2001My Annual Grammar & Language FootnoteI want to explain four points of grammar, in this book of mine:pronouns, commas, italics, and spelling. My unorthodox use of theminvariably offends unemployed English teachers so much that they writeme to apply for a job as my editor.To save us unnecessary correspondence, let me explain. Throughout thisbook, I often use the apparently plural pronoun "they," "them," or"their" after singular antecedents such as, "You must approach someonefor a job and tell them what you can do." This sounds strange and evenwrong to those who know English well. To be sure, we all know there isanother pronoun - "you" - - that may be either singular or plural, butfew of us realize that the pronouns "they," "them," or "their" werealso once treated as both plural and singular in the English language.This changed, at a time in English history when agreement in numberbecame more important than agreement as to sexual gender. Today,however, our priorities have shifted once again. Now, thedistinguishing of sexual gender is considered by many to be moreimportant than agreement in number.The common artifices used for this new priority, such as "she," or "heand she," are--to my mind--tortured and inelegant. Casey Miller andKate Swift, in their classic, The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing, agree,and argue that it is time to bring back the earlier usage of "they,""them," and "their" as both singular and plural just as "you" is areThey further argue that this return to the earlier historical usage hasalready become quite common out on the street--witness a typical signby the ocean which reads "Anyone using this beach after 5 p.m. does soat their own risk.2021欧洲杯意大利

stepdaughter, Serena - - they have beenwonderful to me; as has my faithful staff and secretaries: Norma Wong,Suzanne Anderson, and Loretta Walsh. I thank God for their devotionand dedication to helping people.I lost four dear people out of my life this year, one by divorce (mybeloved wife of fifteen years, Carol) and three by death in the arms ofGod: my ninety-seven year-old aunt, Sister Esther Mary, of theCommunity of the Transfiguration (Episcopal) in Glendale, Ohio, whotaught me to serve the Lord, from my youth up; a famous psychic anddear friend of mine for many years, Jack Schwarz, of Ashland, Oregon(we used to go white-water rafting together); and last, but hardlyleast, a beloved colleague of mine in this field, Yana Parker, authorof The Damn Good Resume Book, who died after a long battle with cancer.I thank God for all of them their example, their lives and their love.In closing, I'd have to be an ingrate not to mention my profoundthanks to The Great Lord God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, andsource of all grace, wisdom, and compassion, Who has given me this workof helping so many people of different faiths, tongues, and nations,with their job-hunt, and with finding meaning for their lives. I amgrateful beyond measure for such a life, such a mission, and such aprivilege.Dick Bolles P.O. Box 379 Walnut Creek California 94597-0379 Wednesday,September 12, 2001My Annual Grammar & Language FootnoteI want to explain four points of grammar, in this book of mine:pronouns, commas, italics, and spelling. My unorthodox use of theminvariably offends unemployed English teachers so much that they writeme to apply for a job as my editor.To save us unnecessary correspondence, let me explain. Throughout thisbook, I often use the apparently plural pronoun "they," "them," or"their" after singular antecedents such as, "You must approach someonefor a job and tell them what you can do." This sounds strange and evenwrong to those who know English well. To be sure, we all know there isanother pronoun - "you" - - that may be either singular or plural, butfew of us realize that the pronouns "they," "them," or "their" werealso once treated as both plural and singular in the English language.This changed, at a time in English history when agreement in numberbecame more important than agreement as to sexual gender. Today,however, our priorities have shifted once again. Now, thedistinguishing of sexual gender is considered by many to be moreimportant than agreement in number.The common artifices used for this new priority, such as "she," or "heand she," are--to my mind--tortured and inelegant. Casey Miller andKate Swift, in their classic, The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing, agree,and argue that it is time to bring back the earlier usage of "they,""them," and "their" as both singular and plural just as "you" is areThey further argue that this return to the earlier historical usage hasalready become quite common out on the street--witness a typical signby the ocean which reads "Anyone using this beach after 5 p.m. does soat their own risk.,欧洲杯竞猜手机appstepdaughter, Serena - - they have beenwonderful to me; as has my faithful staff and secretaries: Norma Wong,Suzanne Anderson, and Loretta Walsh. I thank God for their devotionand dedication to helping people.I lost four dear people out of my life this year, one by divorce (mybeloved wife of fifteen years, Carol) and three by death in the arms ofGod: my ninety-seven year-old aunt, Sister Esther Mary, of theCommunity of the Transfiguration (Episcopal) in Glendale, Ohio, whotaught me to serve the Lord, from my youth up; a famous psychic anddear friend of mine for many years, Jack Schwarz, of Ashland, Oregon(we used to go white-water rafting together); and last, but hardlyleast, a beloved colleague of mine in this field, Yana Parker, authorof The Damn Good Resume Book, who died after a long battle with cancer.I thank God for all of them their example, their lives and their love.In closing, I'd have to be an ingrate not to mention my profoundthanks to The Great Lord God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, andsource of all grace, wisdom, and compassion, Who has given me this workof helping so many people of different faiths, tongues, and nations,with their job-hunt, and with finding meaning for their lives. I amgrateful beyond measure for such a life, such a mission, and such aprivilege.Dick Bolles P.O. Box 379 Walnut Creek California 94597-0379 Wednesday,September 12, 2001My Annual Grammar & Language FootnoteI want to explain four points of grammar, in this book of mine:pronouns, commas, italics, and spelling. My unorthodox use of theminvariably offends unemployed English teachers so much that they writeme to apply for a job as my editor.To save us unnecessary correspondence, let me explain. Throughout thisbook, I often use the apparently plural pronoun "they," "them," or"their" after singular antecedents such as, "You must approach someonefor a job and tell them what you can do." This sounds strange and evenwrong to those who know English well. To be sure, we all know there isanother pronoun - "you" - - that may be either singular or plural, butfew of us realize that the pronouns "they," "them," or "their" werealso once treated as both plural and singular in the English language.This changed, at a time in English history when agreement in numberbecame more important than agreement as to sexual gender. Today,however, our priorities have shifted once again. Now, thedistinguishing of sexual gender is considered by many to be moreimportant than agreement in number.The common artifices used for this new priority, such as "she," or "heand she," are--to my mind--tortured and inelegant. Casey Miller andKate Swift, in their classic, The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing, agree,and argue that it is time to bring back the earlier usage of "they,""them," and "their" as both singular and plural just as "you" is areThey further argue that this return to the earlier historical usage hasalready become quite common out on the street--witness a typical signby the ocean which reads "Anyone using this beach after 5 p.m. does soat their own risk.

stepdaughter, Serena - - they have beenwonderful to me; as has my faithful staff and secretaries: Norma Wong,Suzanne Anderson, and Loretta Walsh. I thank God for their devotionand dedication to helping people.I lost four dear people out of my life this year, one by divorce (mybeloved wife of fifteen years, Carol) and three by death in the arms ofGod: my ninety-seven year-old aunt, Sister Esther Mary, of theCommunity of the Transfiguration (Episcopal) in Glendale, Ohio, whotaught me to serve the Lord, from my youth up; a famous psychic anddear friend of mine for many years, Jack Schwarz, of Ashland, Oregon(we used to go white-water rafting together); and last, but hardlyleast, a beloved colleague of mine in this field, Yana Parker, authorof The Damn Good Resume Book, who died after a long battle with cancer.I thank God for all of them their example, their lives and their love.In closing, I'd have to be an ingrate not to mention my profoundthanks to The Great Lord God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, andsource of all grace, wisdom, and compassion, Who has given me this workof helping so many people of different faiths, tongues, and nations,with their job-hunt, and with finding meaning for their lives. I amgrateful beyond measure for such a life, such a mission, and such aprivilege.Dick Bolles P.O. Box 379 Walnut Creek California 94597-0379 Wednesday,September 12, 2001My Annual Grammar & Language FootnoteI want to explain four points of grammar, in this book of mine:pronouns, commas, italics, and spelling. My unorthodox use of theminvariably offends unemployed English teachers so much that they writeme to apply for a job as my editor.To save us unnecessary correspondence, let me explain. Throughout thisbook, I often use the apparently plural pronoun "they," "them," or"their" after singular antecedents such as, "You must approach someonefor a job and tell them what you can do." This sounds strange and evenwrong to those who know English well. To be sure, we all know there isanother pronoun - "you" - - that may be either singular or plural, butfew of us realize that the pronouns "they," "them," or "their" werealso once treated as both plural and singular in the English language.This changed, at a time in English history when agreement in numberbecame more important than agreement as to sexual gender. Today,however, our priorities have shifted once again. Now, thedistinguishing of sexual gender is considered by many to be moreimportant than agreement in number.The common artifices used for this new priority, such as "she," or "heand she," are--to my mind--tortured and inelegant. Casey Miller andKate Swift, in their classic, The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing, agree,and argue that it is time to bring back the earlier usage of "they,""them," and "their" as both singular and plural just as "you" is areThey further argue that this return to the earlier historical usage hasalready become quite common out on the street--witness a typical signby the ocean which reads "Anyone using this beach after 5 p.m. does soat their own risk.,欧洲杯冠亚军竞猜,欧洲杯2021夺冠热门stepdaughter, Serena - - they have beenwonderful to me; as has my faithful staff and secretaries: Norma Wong,Suzanne Anderson, and Loretta Walsh. I thank God for their devotionand dedication to helping people.I lost four dear people out of my life this year, one by divorce (mybeloved wife of fifteen years, Carol) and three by death in the arms ofGod: my ninety-seven year-old aunt, Sister Esther Mary, of theCommunity of the Transfiguration (Episcopal) in Glendale, Ohio, whotaught me to serve the Lord, from my youth up; a famous psychic anddear friend of mine for many years, Jack Schwarz, of Ashland, Oregon(we used to go white-water rafting together); and last, but hardlyleast, a beloved colleague of mine in this field, Yana Parker, authorof The Damn Good Resume Book, who died after a long battle with cancer.I thank God for all of them their example, their lives and their love.In closing, I'd have to be an ingrate not to mention my profoundthanks to The Great Lord God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, andsource of all grace, wisdom, and compassion, Who has given me this workof helping so many people of different faiths, tongues, and nations,with their job-hunt, and with finding meaning for their lives. I amgrateful beyond measure for such a life, such a mission, and such aprivilege.Dick Bolles P.O. Box 379 Walnut Creek California 94597-0379 Wednesday,September 12, 2001My Annual Grammar & Language FootnoteI want to explain four points of grammar, in this book of mine:pronouns, commas, italics, and spelling. My unorthodox use of theminvariably offends unemployed English teachers so much that they writeme to apply for a job as my editor.To save us unnecessary correspondence, let me explain. Throughout thisbook, I often use the apparently plural pronoun "they," "them," or"their" after singular antecedents such as, "You must approach someonefor a job and tell them what you can do." This sounds strange and evenwrong to those who know English well. To be sure, we all know there isanother pronoun - "you" - - that may be either singular or plural, butfew of us realize that the pronouns "they," "them," or "their" werealso once treated as both plural and singular in the English language.This changed, at a time in English history when agreement in numberbecame more important than agreement as to sexual gender. Today,however, our priorities have shifted once again. Now, thedistinguishing of sexual gender is considered by many to be moreimportant than agreement in number.The common artifices used for this new priority, such as "she," or "heand she," are--to my mind--tortured and inelegant. Casey Miller andKate Swift, in their classic, The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing, agree,and argue that it is time to bring back the earlier usage of "they,""them," and "their" as both singular and plural just as "you" is areThey further argue that this return to the earlier historical usage hasalready become quite common out on the street--witness a typical signby the ocean which reads "Anyone using this beach after 5 p.m. does soat their own risk.

stepdaughter, Serena - - they have beenwonderful to me; as has my faithful staff and secretaries: Norma Wong,Suzanne Anderson, and Loretta Walsh. I thank God for their devotionand dedication to helping people.I lost four dear people out of my life this year, one by divorce (mybeloved wife of fifteen years, Carol) and three by death in the arms ofGod: my ninety-seven year-old aunt, Sister Esther Mary, of theCommunity of the Transfiguration (Episcopal) in Glendale, Ohio, whotaught me to serve the Lord, from my youth up; a famous psychic anddear friend of mine for many years, Jack Schwarz, of Ashland, Oregon(we used to go white-water rafting together); and last, but hardlyleast, a beloved colleague of mine in this field, Yana Parker, authorof The Damn Good Resume Book, who died after a long battle with cancer.I thank God for all of them their example, their lives and their love.In closing, I'd have to be an ingrate not to mention my profoundthanks to The Great Lord God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, andsource of all grace, wisdom, and compassion, Who has given me this workof helping so many people of different faiths, tongues, and nations,with their job-hunt, and with finding meaning for their lives. I amgrateful beyond measure for such a life, such a mission, and such aprivilege.Dick Bolles P.O. Box 379 Walnut Creek California 94597-0379 Wednesday,September 12, 2001My Annual Grammar & Language FootnoteI want to explain four points of grammar, in this book of mine:pronouns, commas, italics, and spelling. My unorthodox use of theminvariably offends unemployed English teachers so much that they writeme to apply for a job as my editor.To save us unnecessary correspondence, let me explain. Throughout thisbook, I often use the apparently plural pronoun "they," "them," or"their" after singular antecedents such as, "You must approach someonefor a job and tell them what you can do." This sounds strange and evenwrong to those who know English well. To be sure, we all know there isanother pronoun - "you" - - that may be either singular or plural, butfew of us realize that the pronouns "they," "them," or "their" werealso once treated as both plural and singular in the English language.This changed, at a time in English history when agreement in numberbecame more important than agreement as to sexual gender. Today,however, our priorities have shifted once again. Now, thedistinguishing of sexual gender is considered by many to be moreimportant than agreement in number.The common artifices used for this new priority, such as "she," or "heand she," are--to my mind--tortured and inelegant. Casey Miller andKate Swift, in their classic, The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing, agree,and argue that it is time to bring back the earlier usage of "they,""them," and "their" as both singular and plural just as "you" is areThey further argue that this return to the earlier historical usage hasalready become quite common out on the street--witness a typical signby the ocean which reads "Anyone using this beach after 5 p.m. does soat their own risk.,欧洲杯正规买球appstepdaughter, Serena - - they have beenwonderful to me; as has my faithful staff and secretaries: Norma Wong,Suzanne Anderson, and Loretta Walsh. I thank God for their devotionand dedication to helping people.I lost four dear people out of my life this year, one by divorce (mybeloved wife of fifteen years, Carol) and three by death in the arms ofGod: my ninety-seven year-old aunt, Sister Esther Mary, of theCommunity of the Transfiguration (Episcopal) in Glendale, Ohio, whotaught me to serve the Lord, from my youth up; a famous psychic anddear friend of mine for many years, Jack Schwarz, of Ashland, Oregon(we used to go white-water rafting together); and last, but hardlyleast, a beloved colleague of mine in this field, Yana Parker, authorof The Damn Good Resume Book, who died after a long battle with cancer.I thank God for all of them their example, their lives and their love.In closing, I'd have to be an ingrate not to mention my profoundthanks to The Great Lord God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, andsource of all grace, wisdom, and compassion, Who has given me this workof helping so many people of different faiths, tongues, and nations,with their job-hunt, and with finding meaning for their lives. I amgrateful beyond measure for such a life, such a mission, and such aprivilege.Dick Bolles P.O. Box 379 Walnut Creek California 94597-0379 Wednesday,September 12, 2001My Annual Grammar & Language FootnoteI want to explain four points of grammar, in this book of mine:pronouns, commas, italics, and spelling. My unorthodox use of theminvariably offends unemployed English teachers so much that they writeme to apply for a job as my editor.To save us unnecessary correspondence, let me explain. Throughout thisbook, I often use the apparently plural pronoun "they," "them," or"their" after singular antecedents such as, "You must approach someonefor a job and tell them what you can do." This sounds strange and evenwrong to those who know English well. To be sure, we all know there isanother pronoun - "you" - - that may be either singular or plural, butfew of us realize that the pronouns "they," "them," or "their" werealso once treated as both plural and singular in the English language.This changed, at a time in English history when agreement in numberbecame more important than agreement as to sexual gender. Today,however, our priorities have shifted once again. Now, thedistinguishing of sexual gender is considered by many to be moreimportant than agreement in number.The common artifices used for this new priority, such as "she," or "heand she," are--to my mind--tortured and inelegant. Casey Miller andKate Swift, in their classic, The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing, agree,and argue that it is time to bring back the earlier usage of "they,""them," and "their" as both singular and plural just as "you" is areThey further argue that this return to the earlier historical usage hasalready become quite common out on the street--witness a typical signby the ocean which reads "Anyone using this beach after 5 p.m. does soat their own risk.欧洲杯外围app,stepdaughter, Serena - - they have beenwonderful to me; as has my faithful staff and secretaries: Norma Wong,Suzanne Anderson, and Loretta Walsh. I thank God for their devotionand dedication to helping people.I lost four dear people out of my life this year, one by divorce (mybeloved wife of fifteen years, Carol) and three by death in the arms ofGod: my ninety-seven year-old aunt, Sister Esther Mary, of theCommunity of the Transfiguration (Episcopal) in Glendale, Ohio, whotaught me to serve the Lord, from my youth up; a famous psychic anddear friend of mine for many years, Jack Schwarz, of Ashland, Oregon(we used to go white-water rafting together); and last, but hardlyleast, a beloved colleague of mine in this field, Yana Parker, authorof The Damn Good Resume Book, who died after a long battle with cancer.I thank God for all of them their example, their lives and their love.In closing, I'd have to be an ingrate not to mention my profoundthanks to The Great Lord God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, andsource of all grace, wisdom, and compassion, Who has given me this workof helping so many people of different faiths, tongues, and nations,with their job-hunt, and with finding meaning for their lives. I amgrateful beyond measure for such a life, such a mission, and such aprivilege.Dick Bolles P.O. Box 379 Walnut Creek California 94597-0379 Wednesday,September 12, 2001My Annual Grammar & Language FootnoteI want to explain four points of grammar, in this book of mine:pronouns, commas, italics, and spelling. My unorthodox use of theminvariably offends unemployed English teachers so much that they writeme to apply for a job as my editor.To save us unnecessary correspondence, let me explain. Throughout thisbook, I often use the apparently plural pronoun "they," "them," or"their" after singular antecedents such as, "You must approach someonefor a job and tell them what you can do." This sounds strange and evenwrong to those who know English well. To be sure, we all know there isanother pronoun - "you" - - that may be either singular or plural, butfew of us realize that the pronouns "they," "them," or "their" werealso once treated as both plural and singular in the English language.This changed, at a time in English history when agreement in numberbecame more important than agreement as to sexual gender. Today,however, our priorities have shifted once again. Now, thedistinguishing of sexual gender is considered by many to be moreimportant than agreement in number.The common artifices used for this new priority, such as "she," or "heand she," are--to my mind--tortured and inelegant. Casey Miller andKate Swift, in their classic, The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing, agree,and argue that it is time to bring back the earlier usage of "they,""them," and "their" as both singular and plural just as "you" is areThey further argue that this return to the earlier historical usage hasalready become quite common out on the street--witness a typical signby the ocean which reads "Anyone using this beach after 5 p.m. does soat their own risk.

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