living glory.You need to know that. What you're ultimately trying to find is acareer that looks terrific inside or out- in the window, and also onyou. Essentially, you are asking what this job feels like. Here aresome questions that will help (you are talking, of course, with workerswho are actually doing the career you think you might like to do):How did you get into this work?What do you like the most about it?What do you like the least about it?And, where else could I find people who do this kind of work? (Youshould always ask them for more than one name, so that if you run intoa dead end at any point, you can easily go back and visit the othernames they suggested.)If it becomes apparent to you, during the course of any of theseInformational Interviews, that this career, occupation, or job you wereexploring definitely doesn't fit you, then the last question (above)gets turned into a different kind of inquiry:Do you have any ideas as to who else I could talk to, about my skillsand Fields of Fascination or interests-so I can find out how they allmight fit together, in one job or career?Then go visit the people they suggest. If they can't think of anyone,ask them if they know who might know. And so on. And so forth."THEY SAYI HAVE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL,BUT I HAVEN'T THE TIMEOR THE MONEY"Next step: having found the names of jobs or careers that interest you,having mentally tried them on to see if they fit, you next want to findout how much training, etc. it takes, to get into that field orcareer. You ask the same people you have been talking to,previously.More times than not, you will hear bad news. They will tell yousomething like: "In order to be hired for this job, you have to have amaster's degree and ten years' experience at it."If you're willing to do that, if you have the time, and the money,fine! But what if you don't? Then you search for the exception:"Yes, but do you know of anyone in this field who got into it withoutthat master's degree, and ten years' experience?And where might I find him or her?And if you don't know of any such person, who might know suchinformation?"Throughout this Informational Interviewing, don't assume anything ("ButI just assumed that..."). Question all assumptions, no matter how manypeople tell you that 'this is the way things are."Keep clearly in mind that there are people out there who will tell yousomething that absolutely isn't so, with every conviction in theirbeing--because they think it's true. Sincerity they have, one hundredpercent. Accuracy is something else again. You will need to check andcrosscheck any information that people tell you or that you read inbooks (even this one).No matter how many people tell you that such-and-so are the rules aboutgetting into a particular occupation, and there are no exceptions-believe me there are exceptions, to almost every rule, except where aprofession has rigid entrance examinations, as in, say, medicine orlaw.Rules are rules. But what you are counting on is that somewhere inthis vast country, somewhere in this vast world, somebody

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living glory.You need to know that. What you're ultimately trying to find is acareer that looks terrific inside or out- in the window, and also onyou. Essentially, you are asking what this job feels like. Here aresome questions that will help (you are talking, of course, with workerswho are actually doing the career you think you might like to do):How did you get into this work?What do you like the most about it?What do you like the least about it?And, where else could I find people who do this kind of work? (Youshould always ask them for more than one name, so that if you run intoa dead end at any point, you can easily go back and visit the othernames they suggested.)If it becomes apparent to you, during the course of any of theseInformational Interviews, that this career, occupation, or job you wereexploring definitely doesn't fit you, then the last question (above)gets turned into a different kind of inquiry:Do you have any ideas as to who else I could talk to, about my skillsand Fields of Fascination or interests-so I can find out how they allmight fit together, in one job or career?Then go visit the people they suggest. If they can't think of anyone,ask them if they know who might know. And so on. And so forth."THEY SAYI HAVE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL,BUT I HAVEN'T THE TIMEOR THE MONEY"Next step: having found the names of jobs or careers that interest you,having mentally tried them on to see if they fit, you next want to findout how much training, etc. it takes, to get into that field orcareer. You ask the same people you have been talking to,previously.More times than not, you will hear bad news. They will tell yousomething like: "In order to be hired for this job, you have to have amaster's degree and ten years' experience at it."If you're willing to do that, if you have the time, and the money,fine! But what if you don't? Then you search for the exception:"Yes, but do you know of anyone in this field who got into it withoutthat master's degree, and ten years' experience?And where might I find him or her?And if you don't know of any such person, who might know suchinformation?"Throughout this Informational Interviewing, don't assume anything ("ButI just assumed that..."). Question all assumptions, no matter how manypeople tell you that 'this is the way things are."Keep clearly in mind that there are people out there who will tell yousomething that absolutely isn't so, with every conviction in theirbeing--because they think it's true. Sincerity they have, one hundredpercent. Accuracy is something else again. You will need to check andcrosscheck any information that people tell you or that you read inbooks (even this one).No matter how many people tell you that such-and-so are the rules aboutgetting into a particular occupation, and there are no exceptions-believe me there are exceptions, to almost every rule, except where aprofession has rigid entrance examinations, as in, say, medicine orlaw.Rules are rules. But what you are counting on is that somewhere inthis vast country, somewhere in this vast world, somebody,欧洲杯外围网址living glory.You need to know that. What you're ultimately trying to find is acareer that looks terrific inside or out- in the window, and also onyou. Essentially, you are asking what this job feels like. Here aresome questions that will help (you are talking, of course, with workerswho are actually doing the career you think you might like to do):How did you get into this work?What do you like the most about it?What do you like the least about it?And, where else could I find people who do this kind of work? (Youshould always ask them for more than one name, so that if you run intoa dead end at any point, you can easily go back and visit the othernames they suggested.)If it becomes apparent to you, during the course of any of theseInformational Interviews, that this career, occupation, or job you wereexploring definitely doesn't fit you, then the last question (above)gets turned into a different kind of inquiry:Do you have any ideas as to who else I could talk to, about my skillsand Fields of Fascination or interests-so I can find out how they allmight fit together, in one job or career?Then go visit the people they suggest. If they can't think of anyone,ask them if they know who might know. And so on. And so forth."THEY SAYI HAVE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL,BUT I HAVEN'T THE TIMEOR THE MONEY"Next step: having found the names of jobs or careers that interest you,having mentally tried them on to see if they fit, you next want to findout how much training, etc. it takes, to get into that field orcareer. You ask the same people you have been talking to,previously.More times than not, you will hear bad news. They will tell yousomething like: "In order to be hired for this job, you have to have amaster's degree and ten years' experience at it."If you're willing to do that, if you have the time, and the money,fine! But what if you don't? Then you search for the exception:"Yes, but do you know of anyone in this field who got into it withoutthat master's degree, and ten years' experience?And where might I find him or her?And if you don't know of any such person, who might know suchinformation?"Throughout this Informational Interviewing, don't assume anything ("ButI just assumed that..."). Question all assumptions, no matter how manypeople tell you that 'this is the way things are."Keep clearly in mind that there are people out there who will tell yousomething that absolutely isn't so, with every conviction in theirbeing--because they think it's true. Sincerity they have, one hundredpercent. Accuracy is something else again. You will need to check andcrosscheck any information that people tell you or that you read inbooks (even this one).No matter how many people tell you that such-and-so are the rules aboutgetting into a particular occupation, and there are no exceptions-believe me there are exceptions, to almost every rule, except where aprofession has rigid entrance examinations, as in, say, medicine orlaw.Rules are rules. But what you are counting on is that somewhere inthis vast country, somewhere in this vast world, somebodyliving glory.You need to know that. What you're ultimately trying to find is acareer that looks terrific inside or out- in the window, and also onyou. Essentially, you are asking what this job feels like. Here aresome questions that will help (you are talking, of course, with workerswho are actually doing the career you think you might like to do):How did you get into this work?What do you like the most about it?What do you like the least about it?And, where else could I find people who do this kind of work? (Youshould always ask them for more than one name, so that if you run intoa dead end at any point, you can easily go back and visit the othernames they suggested.)If it becomes apparent to you, during the course of any of theseInformational Interviews, that this career, occupation, or job you wereexploring definitely doesn't fit you, then the last question (above)gets turned into a different kind of inquiry:Do you have any ideas as to who else I could talk to, about my skillsand Fields of Fascination or interests-so I can find out how they allmight fit together, in one job or career?Then go visit the people they suggest. If they can't think of anyone,ask them if they know who might know. And so on. And so forth."THEY SAYI HAVE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL,BUT I HAVEN'T THE TIMEOR THE MONEY"Next step: having found the names of jobs or careers that interest you,having mentally tried them on to see if they fit, you next want to findout how much training, etc. it takes, to get into that field orcareer. You ask the same people you have been talking to,previously.More times than not, you will hear bad news. They will tell yousomething like: "In order to be hired for this job, you have to have amaster's degree and ten years' experience at it."If you're willing to do that, if you have the time, and the money,fine! But what if you don't? Then you search for the exception:"Yes, but do you know of anyone in this field who got into it withoutthat master's degree, and ten years' experience?And where might I find him or her?And if you don't know of any such person, who might know suchinformation?"Throughout this Informational Interviewing, don't assume anything ("ButI just assumed that..."). Question all assumptions, no matter how manypeople tell you that 'this is the way things are."Keep clearly in mind that there are people out there who will tell yousomething that absolutely isn't so, with every conviction in theirbeing--because they think it's true. Sincerity they have, one hundredpercent. Accuracy is something else again. You will need to check andcrosscheck any information that people tell you or that you read inbooks (even this one).No matter how many people tell you that such-and-so are the rules aboutgetting into a particular occupation, and there are no exceptions-believe me there are exceptions, to almost every rule, except where aprofession has rigid entrance examinations, as in, say, medicine orlaw.Rules are rules. But what you are counting on is that somewhere inthis vast country, somewhere in this vast world, somebody,living glory.You need to know that. What you're ultimately trying to find is acareer that looks terrific inside or out- in the window, and also onyou. Essentially, you are asking what this job feels like. Here aresome questions that will help (you are talking, of course, with workerswho are actually doing the career you think you might like to do):How did you get into this work?What do you like the most about it?What do you like the least about it?And, where else could I find people who do this kind of work? (Youshould always ask them for more than one name, so that if you run intoa dead end at any point, you can easily go back and visit the othernames they suggested.)If it becomes apparent to you, during the course of any of theseInformational Interviews, that this career, occupation, or job you wereexploring definitely doesn't fit you, then the last question (above)gets turned into a different kind of inquiry:Do you have any ideas as to who else I could talk to, about my skillsand Fields of Fascination or interests-so I can find out how they allmight fit together, in one job or career?Then go visit the people they suggest. If they can't think of anyone,ask them if they know who might know. And so on. And so forth."THEY SAYI HAVE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL,BUT I HAVEN'T THE TIMEOR THE MONEY"Next step: having found the names of jobs or careers that interest you,having mentally tried them on to see if they fit, you next want to findout how much training, etc. it takes, to get into that field orcareer. You ask the same people you have been talking to,previously.More times than not, you will hear bad news. They will tell yousomething like: "In order to be hired for this job, you have to have amaster's degree and ten years' experience at it."If you're willing to do that, if you have the time, and the money,fine! But what if you don't? Then you search for the exception:"Yes, but do you know of anyone in this field who got into it withoutthat master's degree, and ten years' experience?And where might I find him or her?And if you don't know of any such person, who might know suchinformation?"Throughout this Informational Interviewing, don't assume anything ("ButI just assumed that..."). Question all assumptions, no matter how manypeople tell you that 'this is the way things are."Keep clearly in mind that there are people out there who will tell yousomething that absolutely isn't so, with every conviction in theirbeing--because they think it's true. Sincerity they have, one hundredpercent. Accuracy is something else again. You will need to check andcrosscheck any information that people tell you or that you read inbooks (even this one).No matter how many people tell you that such-and-so are the rules aboutgetting into a particular occupation, and there are no exceptions-believe me there are exceptions, to almost every rule, except where aprofession has rigid entrance examinations, as in, say, medicine orlaw.Rules are rules. But what you are counting on is that somewhere inthis vast country, somewhere in this vast world, somebody,living glory.You need to know that. What you're ultimately trying to find is acareer that looks terrific inside or out- in the window, and also onyou. Essentially, you are asking what this job feels like. Here aresome questions that will help (you are talking, of course, with workerswho are actually doing the career you think you might like to do):How did you get into this work?What do you like the most about it?What do you like the least about it?And, where else could I find people who do this kind of work? (Youshould always ask them for more than one name, so that if you run intoa dead end at any point, you can easily go back and visit the othernames they suggested.)If it becomes apparent to you, during the course of any of theseInformational Interviews, that this career, occupation, or job you wereexploring definitely doesn't fit you, then the last question (above)gets turned into a different kind of inquiry:Do you have any ideas as to who else I could talk to, about my skillsand Fields of Fascination or interests-so I can find out how they allmight fit together, in one job or career?Then go visit the people they suggest. If they can't think of anyone,ask them if they know who might know. And so on. And so forth."THEY SAYI HAVE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL,BUT I HAVEN'T THE TIMEOR THE MONEY"Next step: having found the names of jobs or careers that interest you,having mentally tried them on to see if they fit, you next want to findout how much training, etc. it takes, to get into that field orcareer. You ask the same people you have been talking to,previously.More times than not, you will hear bad news. They will tell yousomething like: "In order to be hired for this job, you have to have amaster's degree and ten years' experience at it."If you're willing to do that, if you have the time, and the money,fine! But what if you don't? Then you search for the exception:"Yes, but do you know of anyone in this field who got into it withoutthat master's degree, and ten years' experience?And where might I find him or her?And if you don't know of any such person, who might know suchinformation?"Throughout this Informational Interviewing, don't assume anything ("ButI just assumed that..."). Question all assumptions, no matter how manypeople tell you that 'this is the way things are."Keep clearly in mind that there are people out there who will tell yousomething that absolutely isn't so, with every conviction in theirbeing--because they think it's true. Sincerity they have, one hundredpercent. Accuracy is something else again. You will need to check andcrosscheck any information that people tell you or that you read inbooks (even this one).No matter how many people tell you that such-and-so are the rules aboutgetting into a particular occupation, and there are no exceptions-believe me there are exceptions, to almost every rule, except where aprofession has rigid entrance examinations, as in, say, medicine orlaw.Rules are rules. But what you are counting on is that somewhere inthis vast country, somewhere in this vast world, somebody

living glory.You need to know that. What you're ultimately trying to find is acareer that looks terrific inside or out- in the window, and also onyou. Essentially, you are asking what this job feels like. Here aresome questions that will help (you are talking, of course, with workerswho are actually doing the career you think you might like to do):How did you get into this work?What do you like the most about it?What do you like the least about it?And, where else could I find people who do this kind of work? (Youshould always ask them for more than one name, so that if you run intoa dead end at any point, you can easily go back and visit the othernames they suggested.)If it becomes apparent to you, during the course of any of theseInformational Interviews, that this career, occupation, or job you wereexploring definitely doesn't fit you, then the last question (above)gets turned into a different kind of inquiry:Do you have any ideas as to who else I could talk to, about my skillsand Fields of Fascination or interests-so I can find out how they allmight fit together, in one job or career?Then go visit the people they suggest. If they can't think of anyone,ask them if they know who might know. And so on. And so forth."THEY SAYI HAVE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL,BUT I HAVEN'T THE TIMEOR THE MONEY"Next step: having found the names of jobs or careers that interest you,having mentally tried them on to see if they fit, you next want to findout how much training, etc. it takes, to get into that field orcareer. You ask the same people you have been talking to,previously.More times than not, you will hear bad news. They will tell yousomething like: "In order to be hired for this job, you have to have amaster's degree and ten years' experience at it."If you're willing to do that, if you have the time, and the money,fine! But what if you don't? Then you search for the exception:"Yes, but do you know of anyone in this field who got into it withoutthat master's degree, and ten years' experience?And where might I find him or her?And if you don't know of any such person, who might know suchinformation?"Throughout this Informational Interviewing, don't assume anything ("ButI just assumed that..."). Question all assumptions, no matter how manypeople tell you that 'this is the way things are."Keep clearly in mind that there are people out there who will tell yousomething that absolutely isn't so, with every conviction in theirbeing--because they think it's true. Sincerity they have, one hundredpercent. Accuracy is something else again. You will need to check andcrosscheck any information that people tell you or that you read inbooks (even this one).No matter how many people tell you that such-and-so are the rules aboutgetting into a particular occupation, and there are no exceptions-believe me there are exceptions, to almost every rule, except where aprofession has rigid entrance examinations, as in, say, medicine orlaw.Rules are rules. But what you are counting on is that somewhere inthis vast country, somewhere in this vast world, somebody,2021欧洲杯手机投注网living glory.You need to know that. What you're ultimately trying to find is acareer that looks terrific inside or out- in the window, and also onyou. Essentially, you are asking what this job feels like. Here aresome questions that will help (you are talking, of course, with workerswho are actually doing the career you think you might like to do):How did you get into this work?What do you like the most about it?What do you like the least about it?And, where else could I find people who do this kind of work? (Youshould always ask them for more than one name, so that if you run intoa dead end at any point, you can easily go back and visit the othernames they suggested.)If it becomes apparent to you, during the course of any of theseInformational Interviews, that this career, occupation, or job you wereexploring definitely doesn't fit you, then the last question (above)gets turned into a different kind of inquiry:Do you have any ideas as to who else I could talk to, about my skillsand Fields of Fascination or interests-so I can find out how they allmight fit together, in one job or career?Then go visit the people they suggest. If they can't think of anyone,ask them if they know who might know. And so on. And so forth."THEY SAYI HAVE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL,BUT I HAVEN'T THE TIMEOR THE MONEY"Next step: having found the names of jobs or careers that interest you,having mentally tried them on to see if they fit, you next want to findout how much training, etc. it takes, to get into that field orcareer. You ask the same people you have been talking to,previously.More times than not, you will hear bad news. They will tell yousomething like: "In order to be hired for this job, you have to have amaster's degree and ten years' experience at it."If you're willing to do that, if you have the time, and the money,fine! But what if you don't? Then you search for the exception:"Yes, but do you know of anyone in this field who got into it withoutthat master's degree, and ten years' experience?And where might I find him or her?And if you don't know of any such person, who might know suchinformation?"Throughout this Informational Interviewing, don't assume anything ("ButI just assumed that..."). Question all assumptions, no matter how manypeople tell you that 'this is the way things are."Keep clearly in mind that there are people out there who will tell yousomething that absolutely isn't so, with every conviction in theirbeing--because they think it's true. Sincerity they have, one hundredpercent. Accuracy is something else again. You will need to check andcrosscheck any information that people tell you or that you read inbooks (even this one).No matter how many people tell you that such-and-so are the rules aboutgetting into a particular occupation, and there are no exceptions-believe me there are exceptions, to almost every rule, except where aprofession has rigid entrance examinations, as in, say, medicine orlaw.Rules are rules. But what you are counting on is that somewhere inthis vast country, somewhere in this vast world, somebody,living glory.You need to know that. What you're ultimately trying to find is acareer that looks terrific inside or out- in the window, and also onyou. Essentially, you are asking what this job feels like. Here aresome questions that will help (you are talking, of course, with workerswho are actually doing the career you think you might like to do):How did you get into this work?What do you like the most about it?What do you like the least about it?And, where else could I find people who do this kind of work? (Youshould always ask them for more than one name, so that if you run intoa dead end at any point, you can easily go back and visit the othernames they suggested.)If it becomes apparent to you, during the course of any of theseInformational Interviews, that this career, occupation, or job you wereexploring definitely doesn't fit you, then the last question (above)gets turned into a different kind of inquiry:Do you have any ideas as to who else I could talk to, about my skillsand Fields of Fascination or interests-so I can find out how they allmight fit together, in one job or career?Then go visit the people they suggest. If they can't think of anyone,ask them if they know who might know. And so on. And so forth."THEY SAYI HAVE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL,BUT I HAVEN'T THE TIMEOR THE MONEY"Next step: having found the names of jobs or careers that interest you,having mentally tried them on to see if they fit, you next want to findout how much training, etc. it takes, to get into that field orcareer. You ask the same people you have been talking to,previously.More times than not, you will hear bad news. They will tell yousomething like: "In order to be hired for this job, you have to have amaster's degree and ten years' experience at it."If you're willing to do that, if you have the time, and the money,fine! But what if you don't? Then you search for the exception:"Yes, but do you know of anyone in this field who got into it withoutthat master's degree, and ten years' experience?And where might I find him or her?And if you don't know of any such person, who might know suchinformation?"Throughout this Informational Interviewing, don't assume anything ("ButI just assumed that..."). Question all assumptions, no matter how manypeople tell you that 'this is the way things are."Keep clearly in mind that there are people out there who will tell yousomething that absolutely isn't so, with every conviction in theirbeing--because they think it's true. Sincerity they have, one hundredpercent. Accuracy is something else again. You will need to check andcrosscheck any information that people tell you or that you read inbooks (even this one).No matter how many people tell you that such-and-so are the rules aboutgetting into a particular occupation, and there are no exceptions-believe me there are exceptions, to almost every rule, except where aprofession has rigid entrance examinations, as in, say, medicine orlaw.Rules are rules. But what you are counting on is that somewhere inthis vast country, somewhere in this vast world, somebody欧洲杯比赛下注

living glory.You need to know that. What you're ultimately trying to find is acareer that looks terrific inside or out- in the window, and also onyou. Essentially, you are asking what this job feels like. Here aresome questions that will help (you are talking, of course, with workerswho are actually doing the career you think you might like to do):How did you get into this work?What do you like the most about it?What do you like the least about it?And, where else could I find people who do this kind of work? (Youshould always ask them for more than one name, so that if you run intoa dead end at any point, you can easily go back and visit the othernames they suggested.)If it becomes apparent to you, during the course of any of theseInformational Interviews, that this career, occupation, or job you wereexploring definitely doesn't fit you, then the last question (above)gets turned into a different kind of inquiry:Do you have any ideas as to who else I could talk to, about my skillsand Fields of Fascination or interests-so I can find out how they allmight fit together, in one job or career?Then go visit the people they suggest. If they can't think of anyone,ask them if they know who might know. And so on. And so forth."THEY SAYI HAVE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL,BUT I HAVEN'T THE TIMEOR THE MONEY"Next step: having found the names of jobs or careers that interest you,having mentally tried them on to see if they fit, you next want to findout how much training, etc. it takes, to get into that field orcareer. You ask the same people you have been talking to,previously.More times than not, you will hear bad news. They will tell yousomething like: "In order to be hired for this job, you have to have amaster's degree and ten years' experience at it."If you're willing to do that, if you have the time, and the money,fine! But what if you don't? Then you search for the exception:"Yes, but do you know of anyone in this field who got into it withoutthat master's degree, and ten years' experience?And where might I find him or her?And if you don't know of any such person, who might know suchinformation?"Throughout this Informational Interviewing, don't assume anything ("ButI just assumed that..."). Question all assumptions, no matter how manypeople tell you that 'this is the way things are."Keep clearly in mind that there are people out there who will tell yousomething that absolutely isn't so, with every conviction in theirbeing--because they think it's true. Sincerity they have, one hundredpercent. Accuracy is something else again. You will need to check andcrosscheck any information that people tell you or that you read inbooks (even this one).No matter how many people tell you that such-and-so are the rules aboutgetting into a particular occupation, and there are no exceptions-believe me there are exceptions, to almost every rule, except where aprofession has rigid entrance examinations, as in, say, medicine orlaw.Rules are rules. But what you are counting on is that somewhere inthis vast country, somewhere in this vast world, somebody,【欧洲杯指定网投】living glory.You need to know that. What you're ultimately trying to find is acareer that looks terrific inside or out- in the window, and also onyou. Essentially, you are asking what this job feels like. Here aresome questions that will help (you are talking, of course, with workerswho are actually doing the career you think you might like to do):How did you get into this work?What do you like the most about it?What do you like the least about it?And, where else could I find people who do this kind of work? (Youshould always ask them for more than one name, so that if you run intoa dead end at any point, you can easily go back and visit the othernames they suggested.)If it becomes apparent to you, during the course of any of theseInformational Interviews, that this career, occupation, or job you wereexploring definitely doesn't fit you, then the last question (above)gets turned into a different kind of inquiry:Do you have any ideas as to who else I could talk to, about my skillsand Fields of Fascination or interests-so I can find out how they allmight fit together, in one job or career?Then go visit the people they suggest. If they can't think of anyone,ask them if they know who might know. And so on. And so forth."THEY SAYI HAVE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL,BUT I HAVEN'T THE TIMEOR THE MONEY"Next step: having found the names of jobs or careers that interest you,having mentally tried them on to see if they fit, you next want to findout how much training, etc. it takes, to get into that field orcareer. You ask the same people you have been talking to,previously.More times than not, you will hear bad news. They will tell yousomething like: "In order to be hired for this job, you have to have amaster's degree and ten years' experience at it."If you're willing to do that, if you have the time, and the money,fine! But what if you don't? Then you search for the exception:"Yes, but do you know of anyone in this field who got into it withoutthat master's degree, and ten years' experience?And where might I find him or her?And if you don't know of any such person, who might know suchinformation?"Throughout this Informational Interviewing, don't assume anything ("ButI just assumed that..."). Question all assumptions, no matter how manypeople tell you that 'this is the way things are."Keep clearly in mind that there are people out there who will tell yousomething that absolutely isn't so, with every conviction in theirbeing--because they think it's true. Sincerity they have, one hundredpercent. Accuracy is something else again. You will need to check andcrosscheck any information that people tell you or that you read inbooks (even this one).No matter how many people tell you that such-and-so are the rules aboutgetting into a particular occupation, and there are no exceptions-believe me there are exceptions, to almost every rule, except where aprofession has rigid entrance examinations, as in, say, medicine orlaw.Rules are rules. But what you are counting on is that somewhere inthis vast country, somewhere in this vast world, somebody

living glory.You need to know that. What you're ultimately trying to find is acareer that looks terrific inside or out- in the window, and also onyou. Essentially, you are asking what this job feels like. Here aresome questions that will help (you are talking, of course, with workerswho are actually doing the career you think you might like to do):How did you get into this work?What do you like the most about it?What do you like the least about it?And, where else could I find people who do this kind of work? (Youshould always ask them for more than one name, so that if you run intoa dead end at any point, you can easily go back and visit the othernames they suggested.)If it becomes apparent to you, during the course of any of theseInformational Interviews, that this career, occupation, or job you wereexploring definitely doesn't fit you, then the last question (above)gets turned into a different kind of inquiry:Do you have any ideas as to who else I could talk to, about my skillsand Fields of Fascination or interests-so I can find out how they allmight fit together, in one job or career?Then go visit the people they suggest. If they can't think of anyone,ask them if they know who might know. And so on. And so forth."THEY SAYI HAVE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL,BUT I HAVEN'T THE TIMEOR THE MONEY"Next step: having found the names of jobs or careers that interest you,having mentally tried them on to see if they fit, you next want to findout how much training, etc. it takes, to get into that field orcareer. You ask the same people you have been talking to,previously.More times than not, you will hear bad news. They will tell yousomething like: "In order to be hired for this job, you have to have amaster's degree and ten years' experience at it."If you're willing to do that, if you have the time, and the money,fine! But what if you don't? Then you search for the exception:"Yes, but do you know of anyone in this field who got into it withoutthat master's degree, and ten years' experience?And where might I find him or her?And if you don't know of any such person, who might know suchinformation?"Throughout this Informational Interviewing, don't assume anything ("ButI just assumed that..."). Question all assumptions, no matter how manypeople tell you that 'this is the way things are."Keep clearly in mind that there are people out there who will tell yousomething that absolutely isn't so, with every conviction in theirbeing--because they think it's true. Sincerity they have, one hundredpercent. Accuracy is something else again. You will need to check andcrosscheck any information that people tell you or that you read inbooks (even this one).No matter how many people tell you that such-and-so are the rules aboutgetting into a particular occupation, and there are no exceptions-believe me there are exceptions, to almost every rule, except where aprofession has rigid entrance examinations, as in, say, medicine orlaw.Rules are rules. But what you are counting on is that somewhere inthis vast country, somewhere in this vast world, somebody,2021欧洲杯手机投注网,欧洲杯外围网址living glory.You need to know that. What you're ultimately trying to find is acareer that looks terrific inside or out- in the window, and also onyou. Essentially, you are asking what this job feels like. Here aresome questions that will help (you are talking, of course, with workerswho are actually doing the career you think you might like to do):How did you get into this work?What do you like the most about it?What do you like the least about it?And, where else could I find people who do this kind of work? (Youshould always ask them for more than one name, so that if you run intoa dead end at any point, you can easily go back and visit the othernames they suggested.)If it becomes apparent to you, during the course of any of theseInformational Interviews, that this career, occupation, or job you wereexploring definitely doesn't fit you, then the last question (above)gets turned into a different kind of inquiry:Do you have any ideas as to who else I could talk to, about my skillsand Fields of Fascination or interests-so I can find out how they allmight fit together, in one job or career?Then go visit the people they suggest. If they can't think of anyone,ask them if they know who might know. And so on. And so forth."THEY SAYI HAVE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL,BUT I HAVEN'T THE TIMEOR THE MONEY"Next step: having found the names of jobs or careers that interest you,having mentally tried them on to see if they fit, you next want to findout how much training, etc. it takes, to get into that field orcareer. You ask the same people you have been talking to,previously.More times than not, you will hear bad news. They will tell yousomething like: "In order to be hired for this job, you have to have amaster's degree and ten years' experience at it."If you're willing to do that, if you have the time, and the money,fine! But what if you don't? Then you search for the exception:"Yes, but do you know of anyone in this field who got into it withoutthat master's degree, and ten years' experience?And where might I find him or her?And if you don't know of any such person, who might know suchinformation?"Throughout this Informational Interviewing, don't assume anything ("ButI just assumed that..."). Question all assumptions, no matter how manypeople tell you that 'this is the way things are."Keep clearly in mind that there are people out there who will tell yousomething that absolutely isn't so, with every conviction in theirbeing--because they think it's true. Sincerity they have, one hundredpercent. Accuracy is something else again. You will need to check andcrosscheck any information that people tell you or that you read inbooks (even this one).No matter how many people tell you that such-and-so are the rules aboutgetting into a particular occupation, and there are no exceptions-believe me there are exceptions, to almost every rule, except where aprofession has rigid entrance examinations, as in, say, medicine orlaw.Rules are rules. But what you are counting on is that somewhere inthis vast country, somewhere in this vast world, somebody

living glory.You need to know that. What you're ultimately trying to find is acareer that looks terrific inside or out- in the window, and also onyou. Essentially, you are asking what this job feels like. Here aresome questions that will help (you are talking, of course, with workerswho are actually doing the career you think you might like to do):How did you get into this work?What do you like the most about it?What do you like the least about it?And, where else could I find people who do this kind of work? (Youshould always ask them for more than one name, so that if you run intoa dead end at any point, you can easily go back and visit the othernames they suggested.)If it becomes apparent to you, during the course of any of theseInformational Interviews, that this career, occupation, or job you wereexploring definitely doesn't fit you, then the last question (above)gets turned into a different kind of inquiry:Do you have any ideas as to who else I could talk to, about my skillsand Fields of Fascination or interests-so I can find out how they allmight fit together, in one job or career?Then go visit the people they suggest. If they can't think of anyone,ask them if they know who might know. And so on. And so forth."THEY SAYI HAVE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL,BUT I HAVEN'T THE TIMEOR THE MONEY"Next step: having found the names of jobs or careers that interest you,having mentally tried them on to see if they fit, you next want to findout how much training, etc. it takes, to get into that field orcareer. You ask the same people you have been talking to,previously.More times than not, you will hear bad news. They will tell yousomething like: "In order to be hired for this job, you have to have amaster's degree and ten years' experience at it."If you're willing to do that, if you have the time, and the money,fine! But what if you don't? Then you search for the exception:"Yes, but do you know of anyone in this field who got into it withoutthat master's degree, and ten years' experience?And where might I find him or her?And if you don't know of any such person, who might know suchinformation?"Throughout this Informational Interviewing, don't assume anything ("ButI just assumed that..."). Question all assumptions, no matter how manypeople tell you that 'this is the way things are."Keep clearly in mind that there are people out there who will tell yousomething that absolutely isn't so, with every conviction in theirbeing--because they think it's true. Sincerity they have, one hundredpercent. Accuracy is something else again. You will need to check andcrosscheck any information that people tell you or that you read inbooks (even this one).No matter how many people tell you that such-and-so are the rules aboutgetting into a particular occupation, and there are no exceptions-believe me there are exceptions, to almost every rule, except where aprofession has rigid entrance examinations, as in, say, medicine orlaw.Rules are rules. But what you are counting on is that somewhere inthis vast country, somewhere in this vast world, somebody,欧洲杯比赛下注living glory.You need to know that. What you're ultimately trying to find is acareer that looks terrific inside or out- in the window, and also onyou. Essentially, you are asking what this job feels like. Here aresome questions that will help (you are talking, of course, with workerswho are actually doing the career you think you might like to do):How did you get into this work?What do you like the most about it?What do you like the least about it?And, where else could I find people who do this kind of work? (Youshould always ask them for more than one name, so that if you run intoa dead end at any point, you can easily go back and visit the othernames they suggested.)If it becomes apparent to you, during the course of any of theseInformational Interviews, that this career, occupation, or job you wereexploring definitely doesn't fit you, then the last question (above)gets turned into a different kind of inquiry:Do you have any ideas as to who else I could talk to, about my skillsand Fields of Fascination or interests-so I can find out how they allmight fit together, in one job or career?Then go visit the people they suggest. If they can't think of anyone,ask them if they know who might know. And so on. And so forth."THEY SAYI HAVE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL,BUT I HAVEN'T THE TIMEOR THE MONEY"Next step: having found the names of jobs or careers that interest you,having mentally tried them on to see if they fit, you next want to findout how much training, etc. it takes, to get into that field orcareer. You ask the same people you have been talking to,previously.More times than not, you will hear bad news. They will tell yousomething like: "In order to be hired for this job, you have to have amaster's degree and ten years' experience at it."If you're willing to do that, if you have the time, and the money,fine! But what if you don't? Then you search for the exception:"Yes, but do you know of anyone in this field who got into it withoutthat master's degree, and ten years' experience?And where might I find him or her?And if you don't know of any such person, who might know suchinformation?"Throughout this Informational Interviewing, don't assume anything ("ButI just assumed that..."). Question all assumptions, no matter how manypeople tell you that 'this is the way things are."Keep clearly in mind that there are people out there who will tell yousomething that absolutely isn't so, with every conviction in theirbeing--because they think it's true. Sincerity they have, one hundredpercent. Accuracy is something else again. You will need to check andcrosscheck any information that people tell you or that you read inbooks (even this one).No matter how many people tell you that such-and-so are the rules aboutgetting into a particular occupation, and there are no exceptions-believe me there are exceptions, to almost every rule, except where aprofession has rigid entrance examinations, as in, say, medicine orlaw.Rules are rules. But what you are counting on is that somewhere inthis vast country, somewhere in this vast world, somebody欧洲杯2020,living glory.You need to know that. What you're ultimately trying to find is acareer that looks terrific inside or out- in the window, and also onyou. Essentially, you are asking what this job feels like. Here aresome questions that will help (you are talking, of course, with workerswho are actually doing the career you think you might like to do):How did you get into this work?What do you like the most about it?What do you like the least about it?And, where else could I find people who do this kind of work? (Youshould always ask them for more than one name, so that if you run intoa dead end at any point, you can easily go back and visit the othernames they suggested.)If it becomes apparent to you, during the course of any of theseInformational Interviews, that this career, occupation, or job you wereexploring definitely doesn't fit you, then the last question (above)gets turned into a different kind of inquiry:Do you have any ideas as to who else I could talk to, about my skillsand Fields of Fascination or interests-so I can find out how they allmight fit together, in one job or career?Then go visit the people they suggest. If they can't think of anyone,ask them if they know who might know. And so on. And so forth."THEY SAYI HAVE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL,BUT I HAVEN'T THE TIMEOR THE MONEY"Next step: having found the names of jobs or careers that interest you,having mentally tried them on to see if they fit, you next want to findout how much training, etc. it takes, to get into that field orcareer. You ask the same people you have been talking to,previously.More times than not, you will hear bad news. They will tell yousomething like: "In order to be hired for this job, you have to have amaster's degree and ten years' experience at it."If you're willing to do that, if you have the time, and the money,fine! But what if you don't? Then you search for the exception:"Yes, but do you know of anyone in this field who got into it withoutthat master's degree, and ten years' experience?And where might I find him or her?And if you don't know of any such person, who might know suchinformation?"Throughout this Informational Interviewing, don't assume anything ("ButI just assumed that..."). Question all assumptions, no matter how manypeople tell you that 'this is the way things are."Keep clearly in mind that there are people out there who will tell yousomething that absolutely isn't so, with every conviction in theirbeing--because they think it's true. Sincerity they have, one hundredpercent. Accuracy is something else again. You will need to check andcrosscheck any information that people tell you or that you read inbooks (even this one).No matter how many people tell you that such-and-so are the rules aboutgetting into a particular occupation, and there are no exceptions-believe me there are exceptions, to almost every rule, except where aprofession has rigid entrance examinations, as in, say, medicine orlaw.Rules are rules. But what you are counting on is that somewhere inthis vast country, somewhere in this vast world, somebody

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