practitioners.Among the four broad divisions of career-fields, he was most attractedto Service industries.Among the three kinds of skills, he most wanted to use his skills withpeople.So far, so good. Now, where does he go from there?He's going to have to go talk to people. But, how does he choose whoto talk to? Easy. He takes his favorite languages or fields offascination, above- psychiatry, plants, and carpentry--and mentallytranslates them into people with those occupations: namely, apsychiatrist, a gardener, and a carpenter. Then he has to go find atleast one of each. That's relatively easy: the Yellow Pages of thetelephone directory will do, or he may know some of these among thefriends or acquaintances he already has. What he wants to do, now, isgo visit them and ask them: how do you combine these three fields intoone occupation? He knows it may be a career that already exists, or itmay be he will have to create this career for himself."Same career, change of career, same career... change of..."And, how does he decide which of these three to go interview first? Heasks himself which of these persons is most likely to have the largestoverview. (This is often, but not always, the same as asking: who tookthe longest to get their training?) The particular answer here: thepsychiatrist.He would then go see two or three psychiatrists--say the head of thepsychiatry department at the nearest colleges or universities,3 and askthem: Do you have any idea how to put these three subjects- carpentry,plants, and psychiatry -together into one job or career? And if youdon't know, who do you think might? He would keep going until he foundsomeone who had a bright idea about how you put this all together.3. If there were no psychiatrists at any academic institution near him,then he would do all his research with psychiatrists in privatepractice- getting their names from the phone book--and asking them for,and paying for, a half session. This, if there is no other way.1In this particular case (as I said, this is an actual careerchanger's experience), he was eventually told: "Yes, it can all be puttogether. There is a branch of psychiatry that uses plants to helpheal people. That takes care of your interest in plants andpsychiatry. As for your carpentry interests, I suppose you could usethat to build the planters for your plants."INFORMATIONALINTERVIEWINGThere is a name for this process I have just described. It is calledInformational Interviewing--a term I invented many many years ago. Butit is sometimes, incorrectly, called by other names. Some even callthis gathering of information Networking, which it is not.To avoid this confusion, I have summarized in the chart on pages 196and 197 just exactly what Informational Interviewing is, and how itdiffers from the other ways in which people can help and support you,during your job-hunt or career-change- namely, Networking, SupportGroups, and Contacts. I have also thrown in, at no extra charge, afirst column in that chart, dealing with an aspect of the job-hunt thatnever gets talked about:

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practitioners.Among the four broad divisions of career-fields, he was most attractedto Service industries.Among the three kinds of skills, he most wanted to use his skills withpeople.So far, so good. Now, where does he go from there?He's going to have to go talk to people. But, how does he choose whoto talk to? Easy. He takes his favorite languages or fields offascination, above- psychiatry, plants, and carpentry--and mentallytranslates them into people with those occupations: namely, apsychiatrist, a gardener, and a carpenter. Then he has to go find atleast one of each. That's relatively easy: the Yellow Pages of thetelephone directory will do, or he may know some of these among thefriends or acquaintances he already has. What he wants to do, now, isgo visit them and ask them: how do you combine these three fields intoone occupation? He knows it may be a career that already exists, or itmay be he will have to create this career for himself."Same career, change of career, same career... change of..."And, how does he decide which of these three to go interview first? Heasks himself which of these persons is most likely to have the largestoverview. (This is often, but not always, the same as asking: who tookthe longest to get their training?) The particular answer here: thepsychiatrist.He would then go see two or three psychiatrists--say the head of thepsychiatry department at the nearest colleges or universities,3 and askthem: Do you have any idea how to put these three subjects- carpentry,plants, and psychiatry -together into one job or career? And if youdon't know, who do you think might? He would keep going until he foundsomeone who had a bright idea about how you put this all together.3. If there were no psychiatrists at any academic institution near him,then he would do all his research with psychiatrists in privatepractice- getting their names from the phone book--and asking them for,and paying for, a half session. This, if there is no other way.1In this particular case (as I said, this is an actual careerchanger's experience), he was eventually told: "Yes, it can all be puttogether. There is a branch of psychiatry that uses plants to helpheal people. That takes care of your interest in plants andpsychiatry. As for your carpentry interests, I suppose you could usethat to build the planters for your plants."INFORMATIONALINTERVIEWINGThere is a name for this process I have just described. It is calledInformational Interviewing--a term I invented many many years ago. Butit is sometimes, incorrectly, called by other names. Some even callthis gathering of information Networking, which it is not.To avoid this confusion, I have summarized in the chart on pages 196and 197 just exactly what Informational Interviewing is, and how itdiffers from the other ways in which people can help and support you,during your job-hunt or career-change- namely, Networking, SupportGroups, and Contacts. I have also thrown in, at no extra charge, afirst column in that chart, dealing with an aspect of the job-hunt thatnever gets talked about:,欧洲杯外围网址practitioners.Among the four broad divisions of career-fields, he was most attractedto Service industries.Among the three kinds of skills, he most wanted to use his skills withpeople.So far, so good. Now, where does he go from there?He's going to have to go talk to people. But, how does he choose whoto talk to? Easy. He takes his favorite languages or fields offascination, above- psychiatry, plants, and carpentry--and mentallytranslates them into people with those occupations: namely, apsychiatrist, a gardener, and a carpenter. Then he has to go find atleast one of each. That's relatively easy: the Yellow Pages of thetelephone directory will do, or he may know some of these among thefriends or acquaintances he already has. What he wants to do, now, isgo visit them and ask them: how do you combine these three fields intoone occupation? He knows it may be a career that already exists, or itmay be he will have to create this career for himself."Same career, change of career, same career... change of..."And, how does he decide which of these three to go interview first? Heasks himself which of these persons is most likely to have the largestoverview. (This is often, but not always, the same as asking: who tookthe longest to get their training?) The particular answer here: thepsychiatrist.He would then go see two or three psychiatrists--say the head of thepsychiatry department at the nearest colleges or universities,3 and askthem: Do you have any idea how to put these three subjects- carpentry,plants, and psychiatry -together into one job or career? And if youdon't know, who do you think might? He would keep going until he foundsomeone who had a bright idea about how you put this all together.3. If there were no psychiatrists at any academic institution near him,then he would do all his research with psychiatrists in privatepractice- getting their names from the phone book--and asking them for,and paying for, a half session. This, if there is no other way.1In this particular case (as I said, this is an actual careerchanger's experience), he was eventually told: "Yes, it can all be puttogether. There is a branch of psychiatry that uses plants to helpheal people. That takes care of your interest in plants andpsychiatry. As for your carpentry interests, I suppose you could usethat to build the planters for your plants."INFORMATIONALINTERVIEWINGThere is a name for this process I have just described. It is calledInformational Interviewing--a term I invented many many years ago. Butit is sometimes, incorrectly, called by other names. Some even callthis gathering of information Networking, which it is not.To avoid this confusion, I have summarized in the chart on pages 196and 197 just exactly what Informational Interviewing is, and how itdiffers from the other ways in which people can help and support you,during your job-hunt or career-change- namely, Networking, SupportGroups, and Contacts. I have also thrown in, at no extra charge, afirst column in that chart, dealing with an aspect of the job-hunt thatnever gets talked about:practitioners.Among the four broad divisions of career-fields, he was most attractedto Service industries.Among the three kinds of skills, he most wanted to use his skills withpeople.So far, so good. Now, where does he go from there?He's going to have to go talk to people. But, how does he choose whoto talk to? Easy. He takes his favorite languages or fields offascination, above- psychiatry, plants, and carpentry--and mentallytranslates them into people with those occupations: namely, apsychiatrist, a gardener, and a carpenter. Then he has to go find atleast one of each. That's relatively easy: the Yellow Pages of thetelephone directory will do, or he may know some of these among thefriends or acquaintances he already has. What he wants to do, now, isgo visit them and ask them: how do you combine these three fields intoone occupation? He knows it may be a career that already exists, or itmay be he will have to create this career for himself."Same career, change of career, same career... change of..."And, how does he decide which of these three to go interview first? Heasks himself which of these persons is most likely to have the largestoverview. (This is often, but not always, the same as asking: who tookthe longest to get their training?) The particular answer here: thepsychiatrist.He would then go see two or three psychiatrists--say the head of thepsychiatry department at the nearest colleges or universities,3 and askthem: Do you have any idea how to put these three subjects- carpentry,plants, and psychiatry -together into one job or career? And if youdon't know, who do you think might? He would keep going until he foundsomeone who had a bright idea about how you put this all together.3. If there were no psychiatrists at any academic institution near him,then he would do all his research with psychiatrists in privatepractice- getting their names from the phone book--and asking them for,and paying for, a half session. This, if there is no other way.1In this particular case (as I said, this is an actual careerchanger's experience), he was eventually told: "Yes, it can all be puttogether. There is a branch of psychiatry that uses plants to helpheal people. That takes care of your interest in plants andpsychiatry. As for your carpentry interests, I suppose you could usethat to build the planters for your plants."INFORMATIONALINTERVIEWINGThere is a name for this process I have just described. It is calledInformational Interviewing--a term I invented many many years ago. Butit is sometimes, incorrectly, called by other names. Some even callthis gathering of information Networking, which it is not.To avoid this confusion, I have summarized in the chart on pages 196and 197 just exactly what Informational Interviewing is, and how itdiffers from the other ways in which people can help and support you,during your job-hunt or career-change- namely, Networking, SupportGroups, and Contacts. I have also thrown in, at no extra charge, afirst column in that chart, dealing with an aspect of the job-hunt thatnever gets talked about:,practitioners.Among the four broad divisions of career-fields, he was most attractedto Service industries.Among the three kinds of skills, he most wanted to use his skills withpeople.So far, so good. Now, where does he go from there?He's going to have to go talk to people. But, how does he choose whoto talk to? Easy. He takes his favorite languages or fields offascination, above- psychiatry, plants, and carpentry--and mentallytranslates them into people with those occupations: namely, apsychiatrist, a gardener, and a carpenter. Then he has to go find atleast one of each. That's relatively easy: the Yellow Pages of thetelephone directory will do, or he may know some of these among thefriends or acquaintances he already has. What he wants to do, now, isgo visit them and ask them: how do you combine these three fields intoone occupation? He knows it may be a career that already exists, or itmay be he will have to create this career for himself."Same career, change of career, same career... change of..."And, how does he decide which of these three to go interview first? Heasks himself which of these persons is most likely to have the largestoverview. (This is often, but not always, the same as asking: who tookthe longest to get their training?) The particular answer here: thepsychiatrist.He would then go see two or three psychiatrists--say the head of thepsychiatry department at the nearest colleges or universities,3 and askthem: Do you have any idea how to put these three subjects- carpentry,plants, and psychiatry -together into one job or career? And if youdon't know, who do you think might? He would keep going until he foundsomeone who had a bright idea about how you put this all together.3. If there were no psychiatrists at any academic institution near him,then he would do all his research with psychiatrists in privatepractice- getting their names from the phone book--and asking them for,and paying for, a half session. This, if there is no other way.1In this particular case (as I said, this is an actual careerchanger's experience), he was eventually told: "Yes, it can all be puttogether. There is a branch of psychiatry that uses plants to helpheal people. That takes care of your interest in plants andpsychiatry. As for your carpentry interests, I suppose you could usethat to build the planters for your plants."INFORMATIONALINTERVIEWINGThere is a name for this process I have just described. It is calledInformational Interviewing--a term I invented many many years ago. Butit is sometimes, incorrectly, called by other names. Some even callthis gathering of information Networking, which it is not.To avoid this confusion, I have summarized in the chart on pages 196and 197 just exactly what Informational Interviewing is, and how itdiffers from the other ways in which people can help and support you,during your job-hunt or career-change- namely, Networking, SupportGroups, and Contacts. I have also thrown in, at no extra charge, afirst column in that chart, dealing with an aspect of the job-hunt thatnever gets talked about:,practitioners.Among the four broad divisions of career-fields, he was most attractedto Service industries.Among the three kinds of skills, he most wanted to use his skills withpeople.So far, so good. Now, where does he go from there?He's going to have to go talk to people. But, how does he choose whoto talk to? Easy. He takes his favorite languages or fields offascination, above- psychiatry, plants, and carpentry--and mentallytranslates them into people with those occupations: namely, apsychiatrist, a gardener, and a carpenter. Then he has to go find atleast one of each. That's relatively easy: the Yellow Pages of thetelephone directory will do, or he may know some of these among thefriends or acquaintances he already has. What he wants to do, now, isgo visit them and ask them: how do you combine these three fields intoone occupation? He knows it may be a career that already exists, or itmay be he will have to create this career for himself."Same career, change of career, same career... change of..."And, how does he decide which of these three to go interview first? Heasks himself which of these persons is most likely to have the largestoverview. (This is often, but not always, the same as asking: who tookthe longest to get their training?) The particular answer here: thepsychiatrist.He would then go see two or three psychiatrists--say the head of thepsychiatry department at the nearest colleges or universities,3 and askthem: Do you have any idea how to put these three subjects- carpentry,plants, and psychiatry -together into one job or career? And if youdon't know, who do you think might? He would keep going until he foundsomeone who had a bright idea about how you put this all together.3. If there were no psychiatrists at any academic institution near him,then he would do all his research with psychiatrists in privatepractice- getting their names from the phone book--and asking them for,and paying for, a half session. This, if there is no other way.1In this particular case (as I said, this is an actual careerchanger's experience), he was eventually told: "Yes, it can all be puttogether. There is a branch of psychiatry that uses plants to helpheal people. That takes care of your interest in plants andpsychiatry. As for your carpentry interests, I suppose you could usethat to build the planters for your plants."INFORMATIONALINTERVIEWINGThere is a name for this process I have just described. It is calledInformational Interviewing--a term I invented many many years ago. Butit is sometimes, incorrectly, called by other names. Some even callthis gathering of information Networking, which it is not.To avoid this confusion, I have summarized in the chart on pages 196and 197 just exactly what Informational Interviewing is, and how itdiffers from the other ways in which people can help and support you,during your job-hunt or career-change- namely, Networking, SupportGroups, and Contacts. I have also thrown in, at no extra charge, afirst column in that chart, dealing with an aspect of the job-hunt thatnever gets talked about:

practitioners.Among the four broad divisions of career-fields, he was most attractedto Service industries.Among the three kinds of skills, he most wanted to use his skills withpeople.So far, so good. Now, where does he go from there?He's going to have to go talk to people. But, how does he choose whoto talk to? Easy. He takes his favorite languages or fields offascination, above- psychiatry, plants, and carpentry--and mentallytranslates them into people with those occupations: namely, apsychiatrist, a gardener, and a carpenter. Then he has to go find atleast one of each. That's relatively easy: the Yellow Pages of thetelephone directory will do, or he may know some of these among thefriends or acquaintances he already has. What he wants to do, now, isgo visit them and ask them: how do you combine these three fields intoone occupation? He knows it may be a career that already exists, or itmay be he will have to create this career for himself."Same career, change of career, same career... change of..."And, how does he decide which of these three to go interview first? Heasks himself which of these persons is most likely to have the largestoverview. (This is often, but not always, the same as asking: who tookthe longest to get their training?) The particular answer here: thepsychiatrist.He would then go see two or three psychiatrists--say the head of thepsychiatry department at the nearest colleges or universities,3 and askthem: Do you have any idea how to put these three subjects- carpentry,plants, and psychiatry -together into one job or career? And if youdon't know, who do you think might? He would keep going until he foundsomeone who had a bright idea about how you put this all together.3. If there were no psychiatrists at any academic institution near him,then he would do all his research with psychiatrists in privatepractice- getting their names from the phone book--and asking them for,and paying for, a half session. This, if there is no other way.1In this particular case (as I said, this is an actual careerchanger's experience), he was eventually told: "Yes, it can all be puttogether. There is a branch of psychiatry that uses plants to helpheal people. That takes care of your interest in plants andpsychiatry. As for your carpentry interests, I suppose you could usethat to build the planters for your plants."INFORMATIONALINTERVIEWINGThere is a name for this process I have just described. It is calledInformational Interviewing--a term I invented many many years ago. Butit is sometimes, incorrectly, called by other names. Some even callthis gathering of information Networking, which it is not.To avoid this confusion, I have summarized in the chart on pages 196and 197 just exactly what Informational Interviewing is, and how itdiffers from the other ways in which people can help and support you,during your job-hunt or career-change- namely, Networking, SupportGroups, and Contacts. I have also thrown in, at no extra charge, afirst column in that chart, dealing with an aspect of the job-hunt thatnever gets talked about:,欧洲杯什么app能下注practitioners.Among the four broad divisions of career-fields, he was most attractedto Service industries.Among the three kinds of skills, he most wanted to use his skills withpeople.So far, so good. Now, where does he go from there?He's going to have to go talk to people. But, how does he choose whoto talk to? Easy. He takes his favorite languages or fields offascination, above- psychiatry, plants, and carpentry--and mentallytranslates them into people with those occupations: namely, apsychiatrist, a gardener, and a carpenter. Then he has to go find atleast one of each. That's relatively easy: the Yellow Pages of thetelephone directory will do, or he may know some of these among thefriends or acquaintances he already has. What he wants to do, now, isgo visit them and ask them: how do you combine these three fields intoone occupation? He knows it may be a career that already exists, or itmay be he will have to create this career for himself."Same career, change of career, same career... change of..."And, how does he decide which of these three to go interview first? Heasks himself which of these persons is most likely to have the largestoverview. (This is often, but not always, the same as asking: who tookthe longest to get their training?) The particular answer here: thepsychiatrist.He would then go see two or three psychiatrists--say the head of thepsychiatry department at the nearest colleges or universities,3 and askthem: Do you have any idea how to put these three subjects- carpentry,plants, and psychiatry -together into one job or career? And if youdon't know, who do you think might? He would keep going until he foundsomeone who had a bright idea about how you put this all together.3. If there were no psychiatrists at any academic institution near him,then he would do all his research with psychiatrists in privatepractice- getting their names from the phone book--and asking them for,and paying for, a half session. This, if there is no other way.1In this particular case (as I said, this is an actual careerchanger's experience), he was eventually told: "Yes, it can all be puttogether. There is a branch of psychiatry that uses plants to helpheal people. That takes care of your interest in plants andpsychiatry. As for your carpentry interests, I suppose you could usethat to build the planters for your plants."INFORMATIONALINTERVIEWINGThere is a name for this process I have just described. It is calledInformational Interviewing--a term I invented many many years ago. Butit is sometimes, incorrectly, called by other names. Some even callthis gathering of information Networking, which it is not.To avoid this confusion, I have summarized in the chart on pages 196and 197 just exactly what Informational Interviewing is, and how itdiffers from the other ways in which people can help and support you,during your job-hunt or career-change- namely, Networking, SupportGroups, and Contacts. I have also thrown in, at no extra charge, afirst column in that chart, dealing with an aspect of the job-hunt thatnever gets talked about:,practitioners.Among the four broad divisions of career-fields, he was most attractedto Service industries.Among the three kinds of skills, he most wanted to use his skills withpeople.So far, so good. Now, where does he go from there?He's going to have to go talk to people. But, how does he choose whoto talk to? Easy. He takes his favorite languages or fields offascination, above- psychiatry, plants, and carpentry--and mentallytranslates them into people with those occupations: namely, apsychiatrist, a gardener, and a carpenter. Then he has to go find atleast one of each. That's relatively easy: the Yellow Pages of thetelephone directory will do, or he may know some of these among thefriends or acquaintances he already has. What he wants to do, now, isgo visit them and ask them: how do you combine these three fields intoone occupation? He knows it may be a career that already exists, or itmay be he will have to create this career for himself."Same career, change of career, same career... change of..."And, how does he decide which of these three to go interview first? Heasks himself which of these persons is most likely to have the largestoverview. (This is often, but not always, the same as asking: who tookthe longest to get their training?) The particular answer here: thepsychiatrist.He would then go see two or three psychiatrists--say the head of thepsychiatry department at the nearest colleges or universities,3 and askthem: Do you have any idea how to put these three subjects- carpentry,plants, and psychiatry -together into one job or career? And if youdon't know, who do you think might? He would keep going until he foundsomeone who had a bright idea about how you put this all together.3. If there were no psychiatrists at any academic institution near him,then he would do all his research with psychiatrists in privatepractice- getting their names from the phone book--and asking them for,and paying for, a half session. This, if there is no other way.1In this particular case (as I said, this is an actual careerchanger's experience), he was eventually told: "Yes, it can all be puttogether. There is a branch of psychiatry that uses plants to helpheal people. That takes care of your interest in plants andpsychiatry. As for your carpentry interests, I suppose you could usethat to build the planters for your plants."INFORMATIONALINTERVIEWINGThere is a name for this process I have just described. It is calledInformational Interviewing--a term I invented many many years ago. Butit is sometimes, incorrectly, called by other names. Some even callthis gathering of information Networking, which it is not.To avoid this confusion, I have summarized in the chart on pages 196and 197 just exactly what Informational Interviewing is, and how itdiffers from the other ways in which people can help and support you,during your job-hunt or career-change- namely, Networking, SupportGroups, and Contacts. I have also thrown in, at no extra charge, afirst column in that chart, dealing with an aspect of the job-hunt thatnever gets talked about:【欧洲杯指定网投】

practitioners.Among the four broad divisions of career-fields, he was most attractedto Service industries.Among the three kinds of skills, he most wanted to use his skills withpeople.So far, so good. Now, where does he go from there?He's going to have to go talk to people. But, how does he choose whoto talk to? Easy. He takes his favorite languages or fields offascination, above- psychiatry, plants, and carpentry--and mentallytranslates them into people with those occupations: namely, apsychiatrist, a gardener, and a carpenter. Then he has to go find atleast one of each. That's relatively easy: the Yellow Pages of thetelephone directory will do, or he may know some of these among thefriends or acquaintances he already has. What he wants to do, now, isgo visit them and ask them: how do you combine these three fields intoone occupation? He knows it may be a career that already exists, or itmay be he will have to create this career for himself."Same career, change of career, same career... change of..."And, how does he decide which of these three to go interview first? Heasks himself which of these persons is most likely to have the largestoverview. (This is often, but not always, the same as asking: who tookthe longest to get their training?) The particular answer here: thepsychiatrist.He would then go see two or three psychiatrists--say the head of thepsychiatry department at the nearest colleges or universities,3 and askthem: Do you have any idea how to put these three subjects- carpentry,plants, and psychiatry -together into one job or career? And if youdon't know, who do you think might? He would keep going until he foundsomeone who had a bright idea about how you put this all together.3. If there were no psychiatrists at any academic institution near him,then he would do all his research with psychiatrists in privatepractice- getting their names from the phone book--and asking them for,and paying for, a half session. This, if there is no other way.1In this particular case (as I said, this is an actual careerchanger's experience), he was eventually told: "Yes, it can all be puttogether. There is a branch of psychiatry that uses plants to helpheal people. That takes care of your interest in plants andpsychiatry. As for your carpentry interests, I suppose you could usethat to build the planters for your plants."INFORMATIONALINTERVIEWINGThere is a name for this process I have just described. It is calledInformational Interviewing--a term I invented many many years ago. Butit is sometimes, incorrectly, called by other names. Some even callthis gathering of information Networking, which it is not.To avoid this confusion, I have summarized in the chart on pages 196and 197 just exactly what Informational Interviewing is, and how itdiffers from the other ways in which people can help and support you,during your job-hunt or career-change- namely, Networking, SupportGroups, and Contacts. I have also thrown in, at no extra charge, afirst column in that chart, dealing with an aspect of the job-hunt thatnever gets talked about:,欧洲杯手机投注practitioners.Among the four broad divisions of career-fields, he was most attractedto Service industries.Among the three kinds of skills, he most wanted to use his skills withpeople.So far, so good. Now, where does he go from there?He's going to have to go talk to people. But, how does he choose whoto talk to? Easy. He takes his favorite languages or fields offascination, above- psychiatry, plants, and carpentry--and mentallytranslates them into people with those occupations: namely, apsychiatrist, a gardener, and a carpenter. Then he has to go find atleast one of each. That's relatively easy: the Yellow Pages of thetelephone directory will do, or he may know some of these among thefriends or acquaintances he already has. What he wants to do, now, isgo visit them and ask them: how do you combine these three fields intoone occupation? He knows it may be a career that already exists, or itmay be he will have to create this career for himself."Same career, change of career, same career... change of..."And, how does he decide which of these three to go interview first? Heasks himself which of these persons is most likely to have the largestoverview. (This is often, but not always, the same as asking: who tookthe longest to get their training?) The particular answer here: thepsychiatrist.He would then go see two or three psychiatrists--say the head of thepsychiatry department at the nearest colleges or universities,3 and askthem: Do you have any idea how to put these three subjects- carpentry,plants, and psychiatry -together into one job or career? And if youdon't know, who do you think might? He would keep going until he foundsomeone who had a bright idea about how you put this all together.3. If there were no psychiatrists at any academic institution near him,then he would do all his research with psychiatrists in privatepractice- getting their names from the phone book--and asking them for,and paying for, a half session. This, if there is no other way.1In this particular case (as I said, this is an actual careerchanger's experience), he was eventually told: "Yes, it can all be puttogether. There is a branch of psychiatry that uses plants to helpheal people. That takes care of your interest in plants andpsychiatry. As for your carpentry interests, I suppose you could usethat to build the planters for your plants."INFORMATIONALINTERVIEWINGThere is a name for this process I have just described. It is calledInformational Interviewing--a term I invented many many years ago. Butit is sometimes, incorrectly, called by other names. Some even callthis gathering of information Networking, which it is not.To avoid this confusion, I have summarized in the chart on pages 196and 197 just exactly what Informational Interviewing is, and how itdiffers from the other ways in which people can help and support you,during your job-hunt or career-change- namely, Networking, SupportGroups, and Contacts. I have also thrown in, at no extra charge, afirst column in that chart, dealing with an aspect of the job-hunt thatnever gets talked about:

practitioners.Among the four broad divisions of career-fields, he was most attractedto Service industries.Among the three kinds of skills, he most wanted to use his skills withpeople.So far, so good. Now, where does he go from there?He's going to have to go talk to people. But, how does he choose whoto talk to? Easy. He takes his favorite languages or fields offascination, above- psychiatry, plants, and carpentry--and mentallytranslates them into people with those occupations: namely, apsychiatrist, a gardener, and a carpenter. Then he has to go find atleast one of each. That's relatively easy: the Yellow Pages of thetelephone directory will do, or he may know some of these among thefriends or acquaintances he already has. What he wants to do, now, isgo visit them and ask them: how do you combine these three fields intoone occupation? He knows it may be a career that already exists, or itmay be he will have to create this career for himself."Same career, change of career, same career... change of..."And, how does he decide which of these three to go interview first? Heasks himself which of these persons is most likely to have the largestoverview. (This is often, but not always, the same as asking: who tookthe longest to get their training?) The particular answer here: thepsychiatrist.He would then go see two or three psychiatrists--say the head of thepsychiatry department at the nearest colleges or universities,3 and askthem: Do you have any idea how to put these three subjects- carpentry,plants, and psychiatry -together into one job or career? And if youdon't know, who do you think might? He would keep going until he foundsomeone who had a bright idea about how you put this all together.3. If there were no psychiatrists at any academic institution near him,then he would do all his research with psychiatrists in privatepractice- getting their names from the phone book--and asking them for,and paying for, a half session. This, if there is no other way.1In this particular case (as I said, this is an actual careerchanger's experience), he was eventually told: "Yes, it can all be puttogether. There is a branch of psychiatry that uses plants to helpheal people. That takes care of your interest in plants andpsychiatry. As for your carpentry interests, I suppose you could usethat to build the planters for your plants."INFORMATIONALINTERVIEWINGThere is a name for this process I have just described. It is calledInformational Interviewing--a term I invented many many years ago. Butit is sometimes, incorrectly, called by other names. Some even callthis gathering of information Networking, which it is not.To avoid this confusion, I have summarized in the chart on pages 196and 197 just exactly what Informational Interviewing is, and how itdiffers from the other ways in which people can help and support you,during your job-hunt or career-change- namely, Networking, SupportGroups, and Contacts. I have also thrown in, at no extra charge, afirst column in that chart, dealing with an aspect of the job-hunt thatnever gets talked about:,bob综合,买球欧洲杯下单practitioners.Among the four broad divisions of career-fields, he was most attractedto Service industries.Among the three kinds of skills, he most wanted to use his skills withpeople.So far, so good. Now, where does he go from there?He's going to have to go talk to people. But, how does he choose whoto talk to? Easy. He takes his favorite languages or fields offascination, above- psychiatry, plants, and carpentry--and mentallytranslates them into people with those occupations: namely, apsychiatrist, a gardener, and a carpenter. Then he has to go find atleast one of each. That's relatively easy: the Yellow Pages of thetelephone directory will do, or he may know some of these among thefriends or acquaintances he already has. What he wants to do, now, isgo visit them and ask them: how do you combine these three fields intoone occupation? He knows it may be a career that already exists, or itmay be he will have to create this career for himself."Same career, change of career, same career... change of..."And, how does he decide which of these three to go interview first? Heasks himself which of these persons is most likely to have the largestoverview. (This is often, but not always, the same as asking: who tookthe longest to get their training?) The particular answer here: thepsychiatrist.He would then go see two or three psychiatrists--say the head of thepsychiatry department at the nearest colleges or universities,3 and askthem: Do you have any idea how to put these three subjects- carpentry,plants, and psychiatry -together into one job or career? And if youdon't know, who do you think might? He would keep going until he foundsomeone who had a bright idea about how you put this all together.3. If there were no psychiatrists at any academic institution near him,then he would do all his research with psychiatrists in privatepractice- getting their names from the phone book--and asking them for,and paying for, a half session. This, if there is no other way.1In this particular case (as I said, this is an actual careerchanger's experience), he was eventually told: "Yes, it can all be puttogether. There is a branch of psychiatry that uses plants to helpheal people. That takes care of your interest in plants andpsychiatry. As for your carpentry interests, I suppose you could usethat to build the planters for your plants."INFORMATIONALINTERVIEWINGThere is a name for this process I have just described. It is calledInformational Interviewing--a term I invented many many years ago. Butit is sometimes, incorrectly, called by other names. Some even callthis gathering of information Networking, which it is not.To avoid this confusion, I have summarized in the chart on pages 196and 197 just exactly what Informational Interviewing is, and how itdiffers from the other ways in which people can help and support you,during your job-hunt or career-change- namely, Networking, SupportGroups, and Contacts. I have also thrown in, at no extra charge, afirst column in that chart, dealing with an aspect of the job-hunt thatnever gets talked about:

practitioners.Among the four broad divisions of career-fields, he was most attractedto Service industries.Among the three kinds of skills, he most wanted to use his skills withpeople.So far, so good. Now, where does he go from there?He's going to have to go talk to people. But, how does he choose whoto talk to? Easy. He takes his favorite languages or fields offascination, above- psychiatry, plants, and carpentry--and mentallytranslates them into people with those occupations: namely, apsychiatrist, a gardener, and a carpenter. Then he has to go find atleast one of each. That's relatively easy: the Yellow Pages of thetelephone directory will do, or he may know some of these among thefriends or acquaintances he already has. What he wants to do, now, isgo visit them and ask them: how do you combine these three fields intoone occupation? He knows it may be a career that already exists, or itmay be he will have to create this career for himself."Same career, change of career, same career... change of..."And, how does he decide which of these three to go interview first? Heasks himself which of these persons is most likely to have the largestoverview. (This is often, but not always, the same as asking: who tookthe longest to get their training?) The particular answer here: thepsychiatrist.He would then go see two or three psychiatrists--say the head of thepsychiatry department at the nearest colleges or universities,3 and askthem: Do you have any idea how to put these three subjects- carpentry,plants, and psychiatry -together into one job or career? And if youdon't know, who do you think might? He would keep going until he foundsomeone who had a bright idea about how you put this all together.3. If there were no psychiatrists at any academic institution near him,then he would do all his research with psychiatrists in privatepractice- getting their names from the phone book--and asking them for,and paying for, a half session. This, if there is no other way.1In this particular case (as I said, this is an actual careerchanger's experience), he was eventually told: "Yes, it can all be puttogether. There is a branch of psychiatry that uses plants to helpheal people. That takes care of your interest in plants andpsychiatry. As for your carpentry interests, I suppose you could usethat to build the planters for your plants."INFORMATIONALINTERVIEWINGThere is a name for this process I have just described. It is calledInformational Interviewing--a term I invented many many years ago. Butit is sometimes, incorrectly, called by other names. Some even callthis gathering of information Networking, which it is not.To avoid this confusion, I have summarized in the chart on pages 196and 197 just exactly what Informational Interviewing is, and how itdiffers from the other ways in which people can help and support you,during your job-hunt or career-change- namely, Networking, SupportGroups, and Contacts. I have also thrown in, at no extra charge, afirst column in that chart, dealing with an aspect of the job-hunt thatnever gets talked about:,2021欧洲杯买球正规平台practitioners.Among the four broad divisions of career-fields, he was most attractedto Service industries.Among the three kinds of skills, he most wanted to use his skills withpeople.So far, so good. Now, where does he go from there?He's going to have to go talk to people. But, how does he choose whoto talk to? Easy. He takes his favorite languages or fields offascination, above- psychiatry, plants, and carpentry--and mentallytranslates them into people with those occupations: namely, apsychiatrist, a gardener, and a carpenter. Then he has to go find atleast one of each. That's relatively easy: the Yellow Pages of thetelephone directory will do, or he may know some of these among thefriends or acquaintances he already has. What he wants to do, now, isgo visit them and ask them: how do you combine these three fields intoone occupation? He knows it may be a career that already exists, or itmay be he will have to create this career for himself."Same career, change of career, same career... change of..."And, how does he decide which of these three to go interview first? Heasks himself which of these persons is most likely to have the largestoverview. (This is often, but not always, the same as asking: who tookthe longest to get their training?) The particular answer here: thepsychiatrist.He would then go see two or three psychiatrists--say the head of thepsychiatry department at the nearest colleges or universities,3 and askthem: Do you have any idea how to put these three subjects- carpentry,plants, and psychiatry -together into one job or career? And if youdon't know, who do you think might? He would keep going until he foundsomeone who had a bright idea about how you put this all together.3. If there were no psychiatrists at any academic institution near him,then he would do all his research with psychiatrists in privatepractice- getting their names from the phone book--and asking them for,and paying for, a half session. This, if there is no other way.1In this particular case (as I said, this is an actual careerchanger's experience), he was eventually told: "Yes, it can all be puttogether. There is a branch of psychiatry that uses plants to helpheal people. That takes care of your interest in plants andpsychiatry. As for your carpentry interests, I suppose you could usethat to build the planters for your plants."INFORMATIONALINTERVIEWINGThere is a name for this process I have just described. It is calledInformational Interviewing--a term I invented many many years ago. Butit is sometimes, incorrectly, called by other names. Some even callthis gathering of information Networking, which it is not.To avoid this confusion, I have summarized in the chart on pages 196and 197 just exactly what Informational Interviewing is, and how itdiffers from the other ways in which people can help and support you,during your job-hunt or career-change- namely, Networking, SupportGroups, and Contacts. I have also thrown in, at no extra charge, afirst column in that chart, dealing with an aspect of the job-hunt thatnever gets talked about:2021欧洲杯在线投注,practitioners.Among the four broad divisions of career-fields, he was most attractedto Service industries.Among the three kinds of skills, he most wanted to use his skills withpeople.So far, so good. Now, where does he go from there?He's going to have to go talk to people. But, how does he choose whoto talk to? Easy. He takes his favorite languages or fields offascination, above- psychiatry, plants, and carpentry--and mentallytranslates them into people with those occupations: namely, apsychiatrist, a gardener, and a carpenter. Then he has to go find atleast one of each. That's relatively easy: the Yellow Pages of thetelephone directory will do, or he may know some of these among thefriends or acquaintances he already has. What he wants to do, now, isgo visit them and ask them: how do you combine these three fields intoone occupation? He knows it may be a career that already exists, or itmay be he will have to create this career for himself."Same career, change of career, same career... change of..."And, how does he decide which of these three to go interview first? Heasks himself which of these persons is most likely to have the largestoverview. (This is often, but not always, the same as asking: who tookthe longest to get their training?) The particular answer here: thepsychiatrist.He would then go see two or three psychiatrists--say the head of thepsychiatry department at the nearest colleges or universities,3 and askthem: Do you have any idea how to put these three subjects- carpentry,plants, and psychiatry -together into one job or career? And if youdon't know, who do you think might? He would keep going until he foundsomeone who had a bright idea about how you put this all together.3. If there were no psychiatrists at any academic institution near him,then he would do all his research with psychiatrists in privatepractice- getting their names from the phone book--and asking them for,and paying for, a half session. This, if there is no other way.1In this particular case (as I said, this is an actual careerchanger's experience), he was eventually told: "Yes, it can all be puttogether. There is a branch of psychiatry that uses plants to helpheal people. That takes care of your interest in plants andpsychiatry. As for your carpentry interests, I suppose you could usethat to build the planters for your plants."INFORMATIONALINTERVIEWINGThere is a name for this process I have just described. It is calledInformational Interviewing--a term I invented many many years ago. Butit is sometimes, incorrectly, called by other names. Some even callthis gathering of information Networking, which it is not.To avoid this confusion, I have summarized in the chart on pages 196and 197 just exactly what Informational Interviewing is, and how itdiffers from the other ways in which people can help and support you,during your job-hunt or career-change- namely, Networking, SupportGroups, and Contacts. I have also thrown in, at no extra charge, afirst column in that chart, dealing with an aspect of the job-hunt thatnever gets talked about:

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